Universität Wien FIND

150110 SE From imperial courts to Politburo (M3 PR) (2018W)

Elite politics of China in a historical perspective

10.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 15 - Ostasienwissenschaften
Continuous assessment of course work

Details

max. 25 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Thursday 04.10. 15:30 - 17:00 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Thursday 11.10. 15:30 - 17:00 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Thursday 18.10. 15:30 - 17:00 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Thursday 25.10. 15:30 - 17:00 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Thursday 08.11. 15:30 - 17:00 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Thursday 15.11. 15:30 - 17:00 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Thursday 22.11. 15:30 - 17:00 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Thursday 29.11. 15:30 - 17:00 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Thursday 06.12. 15:30 - 17:00 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Thursday 13.12. 15:30 - 17:00 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Thursday 10.01. 15:30 - 17:00 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Thursday 17.01. 15:30 - 17:00 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Thursday 24.01. 15:30 - 17:00 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18
Thursday 31.01. 15:30 - 17:00 Seminarraum Sinologie 2 UniCampus Hof 2 2F-O1-18

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

This course will explore Chinese politics at its core by probing the constitution, organizational structure and operation of the decision-making bodies at the top chamber of the ruling class from the imperial times in ancient China to current affairs in the People's Republic of China. The course will also take on a comparative perspective, examining what elements concerning decision-making at the centre of power in China are shared by or rather differentiate it from other authoritarian states. At the end of the course, you will gain an initial understanding of the complexity of the power structure and dynamics among members of the ruling class in an authoritarian regime; you will learn what are the factors that give an authoritarian ruler more advantages and make him more powerful than others and what are the factors that constitute constraints limiting his power.

Assessment and permitted materials

After an introductory lecture, you will be given a list of topics to choose from for your seminar essay. You will be asked to conduct research on the topic that you have chosen and present your progress at the class. Your regular attendance is mandatory for the course. The essay will constitute 60% of your final grade. Your presentation and class participation will constitute 30% and your attendance 10%.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Examination topics

Reading list

Wu, Silas H. L. (2013) Communication and Imperial Control in China: Evolution of the Palace Memorial System, 1693-1735, [Place of publication not identified]: Harvard University Press.
Artan, Tülay. (2011) Royal courts in dynastic states and empires.
Ho, Alfred Kuo-liang. (1952) The Grand Council in the Ch'ing Dynasty. The Far Eastern Quarterly 11: 167-182.
Huang, Ray. (1986) 1587, ein Jahr wie jedes andere, Frankfurt am Main: Insel Verl.
Huang, Jing. (2000) Factionalism in Chinese Communist Politics (Cambridge Modern China Series), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Pye, Lucian W. (1992) The Spirit of Chinese Politics, Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
Zheng, Yongnian. (2009) The Chinese Communist party as organizational emperor culture, reproduction and transformation, London ; New York: Routledge.

Association in the course directory

PR 421/422

Last modified: Fr 08.02.2019 09:28