Universität Wien FIND
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160158 SE Seminar on the Theory of Grammar (2019W)

Continuous assessment of course work

Details

max. 30 participants
Language: German

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Tuesday 01.10. 10:45 - 12:15 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Tuesday 08.10. 10:45 - 12:15 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Tuesday 15.10. 10:45 - 12:15 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Tuesday 22.10. 10:45 - 12:15 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Tuesday 29.10. 10:45 - 12:15 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Tuesday 05.11. 10:45 - 12:15 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Tuesday 12.11. 10:45 - 12:15 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Tuesday 19.11. 10:45 - 12:15 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Tuesday 26.11. 10:45 - 12:15 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Tuesday 03.12. 10:45 - 12:15 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Tuesday 10.12. 10:45 - 12:15 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Tuesday 17.12. 10:45 - 12:15 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Tuesday 07.01. 10:45 - 12:15 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Tuesday 14.01. 10:45 - 12:15 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Tuesday 21.01. 10:45 - 12:15 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG
Tuesday 28.01. 10:45 - 12:15 Seminarraum 3 Sensengasse 3a 1.OG

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

The focus of this seminar is intended to be on agreement and formal features. The overall goal is to explore the formal mechanisms by which agreement relations involving phi-features (person, number, gender) are derived. The empirical heart of the course will consist in discussing (partial) agreement phenomena (e.g. 'quirky' agreement in Icelandic), PH (person hierarchy) driven agreement displacement phenomena (e.g. in languages like Basque or Georgian), and PCC (person case constraint) phenomena (Bonet 1991), as well as the issue of variation concerning all these phenomena. Naturally a concomitant complexity of problems that will need to be addressed in some detail bears on issues relating to formal features in syntax, such as what the relationships between them are (cf. Bejar 2003), what governs their grouping into larger structures, how the inventory of features in a given language is determined, etc.

Assessment and permitted materials

Students are expected to do the readings before coming to class, come to class (compulsory attendance), participate actively by asking and answering questions, take turns in protocoling the sessions, make a presentation with a handout, and write either an overview paper, or a squib analyzing something having to do with the topic of the seminar and giving arguments for preferring a given analysis to alternatives from the literature.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Students have a command of the literature on (the typology of) agreement phenomena and (main) analyses of those discussed in class, and a deepened knowledge of the formal mechanisms by which agreement relations involving formal features are derived.

Examination topics

All of the topics discussed in class (and protocoled on Moodle).

Reading list

(Selected)
Adger, David, and Daniel Harbour. 2007. Syntax and syncretisms of the Person Case Constraint. Syntax 10:2-37.
Bejar, Susana. 2003. Phi-syntax: A theory of agreement. Doctoral dissertation, University of Toronto.
Bejar, Susana and Milan Rezac. 2009. Cyclic Agree. Linguistic Inquiry 40 (1):35-73.
Bhatt, Rajesh. 2006. Long-distance agreement in Hindi-Urdu. Natural Language and Linguistic Theory 23: 757-807.
Boeckx, Cedric. 2000. Quirky agreement. Studia Linguistica 54:354-380.
Bonet, Eulalia. 1991. Morphology after syntax: Pronominal Clitics in Romance. Doctoral dissertation, MIT, Cambridge, MA.
Collins, Christopher and Paul Postal. 2012. Imposters: A Study of Pronominal Agreement. Cambridge, MIT Press.
Delancey, Scott. 1981. An interpretation of split ergativity and related patterns. Language 57:626-657.
Daniel Harbour, David Adger and Susana Bejar (eds). 2008. Phi theory: Phi-features across modules and interfaces. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Harley, Heidi and Elizabeth Ritter. 2002. Person and number in pronouns: A feature-geometric analysis. Language 78:482-526.
Nevins, Andrew. 2007. The representation of third-person and its consequences for person-case effects. Natural Language and Linguistic Theory 25:273-313.
Nichols, Lynn. 2001. The syntactic basis of referential hierarchy phenomena: Clues from languages with and without morphological case. Lingua 111:515-537.
Ormazabal, Javier and Juan Romero. 2007. Agreement restrictions. Natural Language and Linguistic Theory 25:315-347.
Pancheva, Roumyana & Maria Luisa Zubizarreta. 2018. The Person Case Constraint: the syntactic encoding of perspective. Natural Language & Linguistic Theory 36:1291–1337.
Polinsky, Maria and Eric Potsdam. 2001. Long-distance agreement and topic in Tsez. Natural Language and Linguistic Theory 19:583-646.
Preminger, Omer. 2014. Agreement and its failures. Linguistic Inquiry Monograph 68. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Association in the course directory

MA1-M3
MA1-APM4B

Last modified: We 05.02.2020 12:28