Universität Wien FIND

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, changes to courses and exams may be necessary at short notice (e.g. cancellation of on-site teaching and conversion to online exams). Register for courses/exams via u:space, find out about the current status on u:find and on the moodle learning platform. NOTE: Courses where at least one unit is on-site are currently marked "on-site" in u:find.

Further information about on-site teaching and access tests can be found at https://studieren.univie.ac.at/en/info.

Warning! The directory is not yet complete and will be amended until the beginning of the term.

180084 SE Irrationality (2016W)

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 18 - Philosophie
Continuous assessment of course work

Course Description
In this seminar we will question the role of irrationality in relation to human agency. If a rational agent is someone we hold responsible for her actions because she can account for reasons for doing them; how do we then describe the kind of agency where we don’t know why or what we do, like certain habits, or the kind of actions where we act despite our own will? What makes an act irrational? Is it a failure in the house of reason, as Davidson puts it? Is it an act of Akrasia, the weakness of the will or is it something that occurs out of a reflexive breakdown? Is it an interruption of our capacity to be self-interpreting animals, as Jonathan Lear would have it? The seminar will provide an overview of philosophical attempts to deal with irrationality. We will approach the following questions; how can we account for irrationality in relation to human agency; what counts as irrational acts in the first place and given that such acts exist; are we responsible for them and in which way? In the seminar, we will discuss classical text on rationality and agency (Davidson, Anscombe, Mele) as well as consult phenomenological psychology (Lear, Fuchs, Legrand) in order to address how we are affected in our everyday life by our irrational actions and why they occur. We will thus gain an overview of irrational, arational, non-rational and unconscious aspects of our agential life that ultimately will lead us to discuss and question how we as human beings can make our actions transparent to ourselves qua being rational.

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first serve).

Details

max. 45 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Wednesday 12.10. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Wednesday 19.10. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Wednesday 09.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Wednesday 16.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Wednesday 23.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Wednesday 30.11. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Wednesday 07.12. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Wednesday 14.12. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Wednesday 11.01. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Wednesday 18.01. 13:15 - 15:45 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Wednesday 25.01. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

Aim
The aim of the seminar is to address the relation between action and reason in the kind of actions that blurs this relation and make it questionable. The student will gain an overview of the debates within the philosophy of action as well as the philosophy of psychology concerning irrationality. Hereby the student will be able to assess and orient herself critically in the field of philosophical questioning that concern our human trademark; rationality. Further, the students will practice their basic philosophical skills in presenting arguments as they will be gibing oral as well as written presentations focused on the topics central to our readings.
Method
Close reading of texts, joint discussion, group based discussions, oral presentations, written presentations. All readings for this course will be available on Moodle.

Assessment and permitted materials

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Requirements
- The students should attend 10 or more seminars out of 13.
- The students are expected to read the texts carefully before class and be prepared to discuss the texts in class.
- The students are expected to give one oral presentation of the central arguments of one of the readings during the semester.
- Finally, the students are expected to submit two short essays on topics discussed in class while covering at least two of the assigned texts from the syllabus. The essays are expected to be of 2500 words each. Guidelines and Deadlines will be uploaded on Moodle.
Students will achieve 5 ECTS points from participating successfully in this course.

Examination topics

Reading list


Association in the course directory

BA M 5.3, PP 57.3.3, UF PP 08

Last modified: Mo 07.09.2020 15:36