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180117 SE Phenomenology and Psychiatry (2017W)

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 18 - Philosophie
Continuous assessment of course work

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first served).

Details

max. 25 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Monday 09.10. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 16.10. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 23.10. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 30.10. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 06.11. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 13.11. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 20.11. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 27.11. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 04.12. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 11.12. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 08.01. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 15.01. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 22.01. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 29.01. 09:45 - 11:15 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

Contents:
Dialogue between phenomenology and psychiatry has a long history, dating back to Karl Jaspers’ 1912 appropriation of themes in Edmund Husserl’s work. This course explores the historical and ongoing relationships between phenomenology and psychiatry, focusing on how they facilitate mutual illumination. In the process, the course engages with work by historically important thinkers such as Karl Jaspers, Wolfgang Blankenburg, Eugene Minkowski, Ludwig Binswanger, J. H. van den Berg, and R. D. Laing. Some of the seminars address types of experience associated with specific psychiatric diagnoses, such as schizophrenia, major depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder, and/or with specific symptoms, such as hallucinations and delusions. Other seminars consider broader themes, such as bodily experience, interpersonal relations, and the sense of time in psychiatric illness. Throughout the course, there is an emphasis on how one can do phenomenology and make original phenomenological discoveries by studying experiences of psychiatric illness.

Methods:
• focused readings of key articles and book chapters
• individual and group presentations in seminars
• ‘mini-lectures’ by the seminar leader
• detailed critical discussion of texts, themes, concepts and claims
• writing an essay

Aims:
Students will:
• become familiar with a diverse body of work that brings phenomenology and psychiatry into dialogue with each other
• learn how to interpret and critically discuss specific claims regarding the kinds of experience associated with kinds of psychiatric illness
• learn how to pursue original phenomenological research by engaging with first-person accounts of psychiatric illness
• learn how to present philosophical work
• learn how to write an essay in the style of a professional journal article

Assessment and permitted materials

Requirements for passing the course:
• attend nine or more of the thirteen seminars
• give at least one individual or joint seminar presentation on one of the key readings (20%)
• write an essay of approximately 4000 words (including footnotes but excluding references) in the style of an academic journal article, citing at least ten relevant sources (80%)

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

To pass the course, students will need to attend at least nine of the seminars, give a presentation on one of the readings, and submit an essay of approximately 4000 words. The essay should be submitted by 12:00 on Friday 2nd March 2018.

Examination topics

Some but not all of the material on the reading list, which will be discussed in the seminars.

Reading list

There are one or two core readings for each of seminars 2 to 12, consisting of journal articles, book chapters, and also one book-length memoir of schizophrenia. These are marked * on the reading list and will be made available on-line via ‘moodle’ at least one week in advance of the relevant seminar. You are expected to read all of them. Several other recommended readings will also be posted on-line. You are also encouraged to consult further sources on the reading list, including the ‘general reading’. You do not need to do any preparatory reading before the introductory seminar, and there are no readings for the final seminar. In cases where a source first appeared in German or French and where the English translation is listed here, you are welcome to consult the original instead.

Association in the course directory

Last modified: Mo 07.09.2020 15:36