Universität Wien FIND

180120 FS The Debate over Intuitions in Analytic Philosophy (2012W)

10.00 ECTS (4.00 SWS), SPL 18 - Philosophie
Continuous assessment of course work

This course will be taught in English. In order to qualify for this course, you should have taken courses in analytic philosophy, especially in epistemology, philosophy of language or ethics.

Details

max. 30 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Monday 08.10. 09:00 - 13:00 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 15.10. 09:00 - 13:00 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 22.10. 09:00 - 13:00 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 29.10. 09:00 - 13:00 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 05.11. 09:00 - 13:00 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 12.11. 09:00 - 13:00 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 19.11. 09:00 - 13:00 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 26.11. 09:00 - 13:00 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 03.12. 09:00 - 13:00 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 10.12. 09:00 - 13:00 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 17.12. 09:00 - 13:00 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 07.01. 09:00 - 13:00 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 14.01. 09:00 - 13:00 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 21.01. 09:00 - 13:00 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock
Monday 28.01. 09:00 - 13:00 Hörsaal 3F NIG 3.Stock

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

This course focuses on the role of intuitions in analytic philosophy. This role has been the topic of an intensive debate for the last fifteen years. The debate has been fuelled especially by "experimental philosophy" (Stich and others) which has tried to show that intuitions (concerning central philosophical cases) vary with culture, gender, and social position. There now exist many analyses of, attacks upon, and defenses of, (the role of) intuitions. Important contributions have come from E. Sosa, A. Goldman, F. Jackson, H. Kornblith, and T. Williamson. A new perspective was opened this year with H. Cappelen's book PHILOSOPHY WITHOUT INTUITIONS (OUP, 2012). Cappe-len's thesis is that critics and defenders of intuitions have misunderstood their role completely. In order to make his thesis plausible, Cappelen analyses a range of "classical texts" in analytic philosophy.
This course has three parts. In the first we shall study central texts of the intuitions debate. In the second phase we will discuss the main chapters of Cappelen's book. In the third phase we shall test Cappelen's claims against our own detailed analyses of how classic texts in analytic philosophy invoke intuitions.

Assessment and permitted materials

- every participant writes a two-page "review" of the literature for every meeting
- every participant gives two oral presentations in the seminar
- every participant writes a review of Cappelen's book
- every participant writes a twenty-page "journal paper"
- every participant actively takes part in a one-day workshop on "intuitions"

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Participants will
- become familiar with the recent work around intuitions
- learn how to discuss empirical work relevant to philosphical concerns
- learn how to write in the formats important in contemporary analytic philosophy (short book reviews, review essays, journal paper)
- learn how to give conference/workshop presentations and commentaries

Examination topics

- detailed analysis of texts and arguments
- critical discussion
- writing of various forms of texts
- presenting ideas and texts in "talks"

Reading list

The central literature is contained in:

Herman Cappelen, PHILOSOPHY WITHOUT INTUITIONS, Oxford University Press, 2012.

Michael R. DePaul and William Ramsey (eds.), RETHINKING INTUITION, Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 1998.

Joshua Knobe and Shaun Nichols (eds.), EXPERIMENTAL PHILOSOPHY, Oxford University Press, 2008.

Timothy Williamson, THE PHILOSOPHY OF PHILOSOPHY, Oxford University Press, 2007.

Association in the course directory

MA M3 (A.), M5; MA M1(alt)

Last modified: Fr 31.08.2018 08:52