Universität Wien FIND

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, changes to courses and exams may be necessary at short notice (e.g. cancellation of on-site teaching and conversion to online exams). Register for courses/exams via u:space, find out about the current status on u:find and on the moodle learning platform.

Further information about on-site teaching and access tests can be found at https://studieren.univie.ac.at/en/info.

Warning! The directory is not yet complete and will be amended until the beginning of the term.

180167 SE Why Should I be Responsible for my Inadvertent Acts? (2018W)

Understanding the Puzzle of Responsibility in Negligence

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 18 - Philosophie
Continuous assessment of course work

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first served).

Details

max. 30 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Friday 12.10. 14:00 - 16:45 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Saturday 13.10. 14:00 - 16:45 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Friday 09.11. 14:00 - 16:45 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Saturday 10.11. 14:00 - 16:45 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Friday 16.11. 14:00 - 16:45 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Saturday 17.11. 14:00 - 16:45 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Friday 23.11. 14:00 - 16:45 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Saturday 24.11. 14:00 - 16:45 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

The topic of the nature of responsibility in negligence is of great importance in legal philosophy as it concentrates on whether we should be responsible for things we do inadvertently or when we lack self-control because we are not fully aware of what we are doing. We will attempt to understand negligence in light of ancient and contemporary theories of responsibility, theories of action, the notion of practical reason and weakness of the will.
We will evaluate different texts and aim to advance the sound conception of responsibility in negligence.

Assessment and permitted materials

The sessions require prior reading and comprehension of the texts. Each session will begin with a one-hour lecture on the topic, followed by a presentation of some of the texts and a discussion to achieve both a deeper comprehension and a critical perspective of the arguments of the texts. You will require to read the material prior to the session and answer some questions which you will find on moodle. Each student will be asked to give a 20-30 minutes presentation of the material to be discussed. In the first session, there will be no presentations. Active participation of all students is essential.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

The course will be assessed by a final essay (3 000 words, excluding bibliography and footnotes) and a presentation. The weight of each will be as follows:
Presentation: 15%
Essay: 85%
There will be a choice among different essay questions which will be given on Friday 25th May. You will be asked to submit the final essay on Monday 25th June

Examination topics

Reading list

Adams, Robert M, Involuntary Sins. In: The Philosophical Review (1985), Vol. 1985, pp. 3-31.?
Anscombe, Elisabeth, Intention (Cambridge, Mass.: HUP, second edition 2000, first edition 1957), pp. 1-15; pp. 32-84.
Aquinas, Thomas, Summa Theologicae Ia2ae, Vol. 17, questions 6-17, translated by Thomas Gilby (Cambridge: CUP, corrected edition 2006).
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, 1110a to 111b and 1145a15 to 1147b20, and also 1113a25 to 1115a23.
Clarke, Randolph, Modest Libertarianism. In: Philosophical Perspectives Vol.14, (2000), pp.21-45.
Fischer, John M. and Tognazzi, Neal, The Truth about Tracing. In : Nous (2009), Vol. 43, pp. 531-556.
Fitzpatrick, William, Moral Responsibility and Normative Ignorance: Answering a New Sceptical Challenge. In: Ethics (2008), Vol, 118, pp. 589-613.?
Gardner, John, The Mark of Responsibility. In: The Oxford Journal of Legal Studies (2003), Vol. 23, pp. 157-171.
Kenny, A, The Practical Syllogism and Incontinence. In: Phronesis (1966), Vol. 11, pp. 163-184.
King, Matthew, The Problem with Tracing. In: Social Theory and Practice, Vol. 35 (2009), pp. 269-291.
Mele, Alfred, Libertarianism, Luck and Control. In: 86 Pacific Philosophical Quarterly (2005), pp.381-407.
Nagel, Thomas, Moral Luck. In: Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society (1976), Vol. 50, pp. 137-151.
Plato’s Protagoras, 352b3 to 358d2.
Rorty. Amélie, Akrasia and Pleasure in the Nicomachean Ethics, Book . In: Essays on Aristotle’s Ethics Rorty (ed.) (Berkeley, University of California Press, 1980), pp. 267-284.?

Association in the course directory

Last modified: Mo 07.09.2020 15:36