Universität Wien FIND

180169 SE Conceptual Analysis (2019W)

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 18 - Philosophie
Continuous assessment of course work

Registration/Deregistration

Details

max. 30 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Tuesday 08.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Tuesday 22.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Tuesday 29.10. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Tuesday 12.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Tuesday 19.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Tuesday 26.11. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Tuesday 03.12. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Tuesday 10.12. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Tuesday 07.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Tuesday 14.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Tuesday 21.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien
Tuesday 28.01. 15:00 - 16:30 Hörsaal 2G, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/2.Stock, 1010 Wien

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

Conceptual Analysis is one of the oldest and best known philosophical methods. However it has never been an uncontroversial method. Currently, contemporary versions of conceptual analysis are under attack from experimental philosophy. In this seminar, we will discuss a series of mostly fairly recent contributions on the topic of conceptual analysis, both favourable and critical (the exact list of texts will be advertised at the end of September), but the list of works below should give an idea of what kinds of texts these will be: our readings in the seminar will be in large part a selection from that list.
Method: we will discuss one text in each of the first 8 or 9 sessions. Participants are to upload a short summary of the relevant text before each session (i.e. main theses and arguments for them), together with questions for discussion (if any). In each session one (or more) participant will chair the discussion and ensure that we distribute our attention in a suitable way across the various aspects of the text in question. Towards the end of the semester we will spend ca. 4 sessions on participants’ short presentations on one of a list of (ca. 10) essay topics issued by the organiser. (Participants can also get their own essay topics approved.). The presentations will be followed by discussion with the other participants. The essays should then be elaborated on the basis of the presentation and the feedback received in the discussion.

Assessment and permitted materials

First: Preparation for the sessions, i.e. summaries: 20%. Second: short presentation on on of the listed essay topics: 20%. Third: Essay, 2000 words maximum, deadline for submission: 16 February 2020: 60%.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Minimum requirements: regular attendance (incl moderation of discussion, in so far as possible), completion of all assessments (summaries, short presentation, essay).
Assessment criteria: the overall grade will be a weighted average of the three partial grades: summaries (20%), short presentation (20%), essay (60%).

Examination topics

The exact texts for each session will be announced at the beginning of the semester. In the meantime, I have included below a list of references that should give some orientation as to the kind of material we shall be reading:
Chalmers, David 2012: Constructing the World. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Grice, H. Paul 1958: “Postwar Oxford Philosophy”. In Studies in the Way of Words. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, pp. 171–80.
Grice, H. Paul 1958: “Conceptual Analysis and the Province of Philosophy”. In Studies in the Way of Words. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, pp. 181–5.
Jackson, Frank 1998: From Metaphysics to Ethics: A Defence of Conceptual Analysis. Oxford: Oxford University Press. [Especially ch. 2]
Levin, Janet 2014: “Reclaiming the Armchair”. In Chris Daly (ed), The Palgrave Handbook of Philosophical Methods. Basingstoke: Palgrave, pp. 448–77.
Machery, Edouard 2017: Philosophy Within Its Proper Bounds. Oxford: Oxford University Press
Papineau, David 2009: “The Poverty of Analysis”. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 83, pp. 1–30.
Strawson, Peter F. 1992: Analysis and Metaphysics.
Strevens, Michael 2019: Thinking Off Your Feet: How Empirical Psychology Vindicates Armchair Philosophy. Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
Weatherson, Brian 2003: “What good are counterexamples?”, Philosophical Studies 115, 1–31.
Williamson, Timothy 2007: The Philosophy of Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Reading list

The exact texts for each session will be announced at the beginning of the semester. In the meantime, I have included below a list of references that should give some orientation as to the kind of material we shall be reading:
Chalmers, David 2012: Constructing the World. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Grice, H. Paul 1958: “Postwar Oxford Philosophy”. In Studies in the Way of Words. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, pp. 171–80.
Grice, H. Paul 1958: “Conceptual Analysis and the Province of Philosophy”. In Studies in the Way of Words. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, pp. 181–5.
Jackson, Frank 1998: From Metaphysics to Ethics: A Defence of Conceptual Analysis. Oxford: Oxford University Press. [Especially ch. 2]
Levin, Janet 2014: “Reclaiming the Armchair”. In Chris Daly (ed), The Palgrave Handbook of Philosophical Methods. Basingstoke: Palgrave, pp. 448–77.
Machery, Edouard 2017: Philosophy Within Its Proper Bounds. Oxford: Oxford University Press
Papineau, David 2009: “The Poverty of Analysis”. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 83, pp. 1–30.
Strawson, Peter F. 1992: Analysis and Metaphysics.
Strevens, Michael 2019: Thinking Off Your Feet: How Empirical Psychology Vindicates Armchair Philosophy. Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
Weatherson, Brian 2003: “What good are counterexamples?”, Philosophical Studies 115, 1–31.
Williamson, Timothy 2007: The Philosophy of Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Association in the course directory

Last modified: Tu 01.10.2019 19:08