Universität Wien FIND

180176 KU Mechanistic philosophy of science (2019S)

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 18 - Philosophie
Continuous assessment of course work

Details

max. 30 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Wednesday 13.03. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal. 2H NIG 2.Stock
Wednesday 20.03. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal. 2H NIG 2.Stock
Wednesday 27.03. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal. 2H NIG 2.Stock
Wednesday 03.04. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal. 2H NIG 2.Stock
Wednesday 10.04. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal. 2H NIG 2.Stock
Wednesday 08.05. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal. 2H NIG 2.Stock
Wednesday 15.05. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal. 2H NIG 2.Stock
Wednesday 22.05. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal. 2H NIG 2.Stock
Wednesday 29.05. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal. 2H NIG 2.Stock
Wednesday 05.06. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal. 2H NIG 2.Stock
Wednesday 12.06. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal. 2H NIG 2.Stock
Wednesday 19.06. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal. 2H NIG 2.Stock
Wednesday 26.06. 13:15 - 14:45 Hörsaal. 2H NIG 2.Stock

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

CONTENT:
Mechanistic philosophy has been the main paradigm of philosophy of biology for two decades. Recently, it has become increasingly under attack. Especially new modeling approaches within biological research such as network analysis and dynamic systems theory have challenged the mechanistic approach.

OBJECTIVES:
The course provides a comprehensive view into the recent discussion of mechanisms, especially within philosophy of biology and neuroscience. Having taken the course the students are able to follow the state-of-art discussion of mechanisms in philosophy of science. Through the discussion of the mechanistic philosophy, the students will also become familiar with other philosophical topics, such as explanation, causality, reductionism and unification.

METHODS:
Close reading and critical discussion of the literature (concepts, themes, arguments), written reflections of the articles, (co-)chairing the group discussion, and a short group presentation of an article of interest.

Assessment and permitted materials

ASSESSMENT:
Assessment is based on attendance, class participation and weekly assignments.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

REQUIREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT CRITERIA:
1. Active participation to the seminar
2. Reflections of weekly readings submitted to Moodle 24 hours before the class
3. Chairing class discussion
4. Presenting an article of your own choosing in the class

Examination topics

Reading list

BOOK:
Craver, Carl (2007). Explaining the Brain. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

JOURNAL ARTICLES (in Moodle)
Baetu, T. M. (2015). The completeness of mechanistic explanations. Philosophy of Science, 82(5), 775-786.

Drukarch et al. (2018). Thinking about the nerve impulse: A critical analysis of the electricity-centered conception of nerve excitability. Progress in Neurobiology.

Green, S., Şerban, M., Scholl, R., Jones, N., Brigandt, I., & Bechtel, W. (2017). Network analyses in systems biology: New strategies for dealing with biological complexity. Synthese1-27.

Knuuttila, T. T., & Loettgers, A. (2013). Synthetic modeling and the mechanistic account: Material recombination and beyond. Philosophy of Science, 80(5), 874-885.

Levy, A., & Bechtel, W. (2013). Abstraction and the organization of mechanisms. Philosophy of Science, 80(2), 241-261.

Love, A. C., & Nathan, M. J. (2015). The idealization of causation in mechanistic explanation. Philosophy of Science, 82(5), 761-774.

Machamer, P., Lindley, D., & Craver, C. F. (2000). Thinking about mechanisms. Philosophy of Science, 67(1), 1-25.

Rathkopf, C. 2018. “Network Representation and Complex Systems.” Synthese 195:55-8.

Association in the course directory

Last modified: Mo 05.08.2019 11:28