Universität Wien FIND

Return to Vienna for the summer semester of 2022. We are planning to hold courses mainly on site to enable the personal exchange between you, your teachers and fellow students. We have labelled digital and mixed courses in u:find accordingly.

Due to COVID-19, there might be changes at short notice (e.g. individual classes in a digital format). Obtain information about the current status on u:find and check your e-mails regularly.

Please read the information on https://studieren.univie.ac.at/en/info.

210119 SE M7: State Activity, Policy and Governance Analyses (2021W)

Political Representation

9.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 21 - Politikwissenschaft
Continuous assessment of course work
MIXED

Eine Anmeldung über u:space innerhalb der Anmeldephase ist erforderlich! Eine nachträgliche Anmeldung ist NICHT möglich.
Studierende, die der ersten Einheit unentschuldigt fernbleiben, verlieren ihren Platz in der Lehrveranstaltung.

Achten Sie auf die Einhaltung der Standards guter wissenschaftlicher Praxis und die korrekte Anwendung der Techniken wissenschaftlichen Arbeitens und Schreibens.
Plagiierte und erschlichene Teilleistungen führen zur Nichtbewertung der Lehrveranstaltung (Eintragung eines 'X' im Sammelzeugnis).
Die Lehrveranstaltungsleitung kann Studierende zu einem notenrelevanten Gespräch über erbrachte Teilleistungen einladen.

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first served).

Details

max. 50 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Students must attend the first session in person. Sessions may switch between in-person and online. Details will be discussed in the first session.

***UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE ALL SESSIONS WILL BE HELD ONLINE***

Thursday 07.10. 16:45 - 18:15 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 1 (H1), NIG 2.Stock
Thursday 14.10. 16:45 - 18:15 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 1 (H1), NIG 2.Stock
Thursday 21.10. 16:45 - 18:15 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 1 (H1), NIG 2.Stock
Thursday 28.10. 16:45 - 18:15 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 1 (H1), NIG 2.Stock
Thursday 04.11. 16:45 - 18:15 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 1 (H1), NIG 2.Stock
Thursday 11.11. 16:45 - 18:15 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 1 (H1), NIG 2.Stock
Thursday 18.11. 16:45 - 18:15 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 1 (H1), NIG 2.Stock
Thursday 25.11. 16:45 - 18:15 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 1 (H1), NIG 2.Stock
Thursday 02.12. 16:45 - 18:15 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 1 (H1), NIG 2.Stock
Thursday 09.12. 16:45 - 18:15 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 1 (H1), NIG 2.Stock
Thursday 16.12. 16:45 - 18:15 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 1 (H1), NIG 2.Stock
Thursday 13.01. 16:45 - 18:15 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 1 (H1), NIG 2.Stock
Thursday 20.01. 16:45 - 18:15 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 1 (H1), NIG 2.Stock
Thursday 27.01. 16:45 - 18:15 Hybride Lehre
Hörsaal 1 (H1), NIG 2.Stock

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

This course provides an advanced introduction to theoretical and empirical research on political representation. At its core, representative democracy is about representatives as politicians, legislators, members of government, party leaders, heads of state, or “political figures” who act and speak for constituents as citizens, voters, or groups. This course offers a holistic view on such relationships of representation: how should we think about the representative-constituent relationship? What constitutes such a relationship? How do representatives represent constituents when speaking in public, taking positions on issues, working in parliament, or passing legislation? Which groups are particularly well or poorly represented in politics? What political institutions facilitate or hamper representation? And, do constituents have different views about how they want to be represented by politicians?

The course provides an overview of various debates on political representation bridging theoretical and empirical perspectives. The first block will be devoted to theoretical models and conceptions of representation. The remaining two blocks focus on empirical studies of different aspects of representation. The second block engages with the representation of different constituents (e.g. the median voter, women, minorities, the poor). The third block looks at factors that weaken or strengthen representation as well as at citizens’ preferences for representation.

Throughout the course, we will put special emphasis on drawing connections between theoretical models of representation and empirical approaches and studies. We will also regularly consider if and how representation could be improved.

Upon successful completion of the course, students should be able to:
• Understand and engage with key theoretical conceptions of representation
• Draw connections between theoretical models of representation and empirical studies of representation
• Read and engage with state-of-the-art empirical research on political representation as well as critically assess such work
• Develop their own research questions on political representation
• Answer complex political science questions orally and in writing

Assessment and permitted materials

• Active participation and contribution in class discussions (15%)
• Essay (1,500 words) on an application of a theoretical conception of representation to a “real-world” example (20%)
• Research plan (1,000 words) for final assignment and engagement in peer-to-peer feedback (15%)
• Final assignment (5,000 words) as seminar paper or long essay (50%)

Attendance of all sessions is mandatory. Students cannot miss more than two sessions and must attend the first session.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Students have to pass each assessment part (see above) to obtain a positive grade for the course.

Examination topics

Topics covered in the course and class discussions, the literature on the syllabus and potentially additional materials students decide to engage with for an assessment (e.g. for final assignments).

Reading list

(Examples from the syllabus. The full syllabus will be announced at the beginning of term.)

Manin, Bernard, Adam Przeworski, and Susan C. Stokes. 1999. “Elections and Representation.” In Democracy, Accountability, and Representation, eds. Adam Przeworski, Susan C. Stokes, and Bernard Manin. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, p. 29–54.

Pitkin, Hanna. 1967. The Concept of Representation. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Mansbridge, Jane. 2003. “Rethinking Representation.” American Political Science Review 97(4): 515–528.

Stimson, James A., Michael B. MacKuen, and Robert S. Erikson. 1995. “Dynamic Representation.” American Political Science Review 89(3): 543–565.

Schwindt-Bayer, Leslie A, and William Mishler. 2005. “An Integrated Model of Women’s Representation.” The Journal of Politics 67(2): 407–428.

Broockman, David E. 2013. “Black Politicians Are More Intrinsically Motivated to Advance Backs’ Interests: A Field Experiment Manipulating Political Incentives.” American Journal of Political Science 57(3): 521–536.

Gilens, Martin. 2005. “Inequality and Democratic Responsiveness.” Public Opinion Quarterly 69(5): 778–796.

Page, Benjamin I., and Robert Y. Shapiro. 1983. “Effects of Public Opinion on Policy.” American Political Science Review 77(1): 175–190.

Canes-Wrone, Brandice, and Kenneth W. Shotts. 2004. “The Conditional Nature of Presidential Responsiveness to Public Opinion.” American Journal of Political Science 48(4): 690–706.

Wlezien, Christopher, and Stuart N. Soroka. 2012. “Political Institutions and the Opinion–Policy Link.” West European Politics 35(6): 1407–1432.

Wolak, Jennifer. 2017. “Public Expectations of State Legislators.” Legislative Studies Quarterly 42(2): 175–209.

Association in the course directory

Last modified: We 24.11.2021 10:09