Universität Wien FIND

210134 SE M11: FOP Research Practice (2018W)

(engl.)

12.00 ECTS (4.00 SWS), SPL 21 - Politikwissenschaft
Continuous assessment of course work

A registration via u:space during the registration phase is required. Late registrations are NOT possible.
Students who miss the first lesson without prior notification will lose their seat in the course.

Follow the principles of good scientific practice.

The course instructor may invite students to an oral exam about the student’s written contributions in the course. Plagiarized contributions have the consequence that the course won’t be graded (instead the course will be marked with an ‘X’ in the transcript of records).

Details

max. 35 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Tuesday 09.10. 09:00 - 12:00 Hörsaal H10, Rathausstraße 19, Stiege 2, Hochparterre
Tuesday 16.10. 09:00 - 12:00 Hörsaal H10, Rathausstraße 19, Stiege 2, Hochparterre
Tuesday 23.10. 09:00 - 12:00 Hörsaal H10, Rathausstraße 19, Stiege 2, Hochparterre
Tuesday 30.10. 09:00 - 12:00 Hörsaal H10, Rathausstraße 19, Stiege 2, Hochparterre
Tuesday 06.11. 09:00 - 12:00 Hörsaal H10, Rathausstraße 19, Stiege 2, Hochparterre
Tuesday 13.11. 09:00 - 12:00 Hörsaal H10, Rathausstraße 19, Stiege 2, Hochparterre
Tuesday 20.11. 09:00 - 12:00 Hörsaal H10, Rathausstraße 19, Stiege 2, Hochparterre
Tuesday 27.11. 09:00 - 12:00 Hörsaal H10, Rathausstraße 19, Stiege 2, Hochparterre
Tuesday 04.12. 09:00 - 12:00 Hörsaal H10, Rathausstraße 19, Stiege 2, Hochparterre
Tuesday 11.12. 09:00 - 12:00 Hörsaal H10, Rathausstraße 19, Stiege 2, Hochparterre
Tuesday 08.01. 09:00 - 12:00 Hörsaal H10, Rathausstraße 19, Stiege 2, Hochparterre
Tuesday 15.01. 09:00 - 12:00 Hörsaal H10, Rathausstraße 19, Stiege 2, Hochparterre
Tuesday 22.01. 09:00 - 12:00 Hörsaal H10, Rathausstraße 19, Stiege 2, Hochparterre
Tuesday 29.01. 09:00 - 12:00 Hörsaal H10, Rathausstraße 19, Stiege 2, Hochparterre

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

The goals of the research practice seminar are twofold. First, students will become acquainted with theories and recent research on social groups and party identification. Recent years have seen a resurgence of interest in social identity theory as well as group theories of democratic politics (e.g. Cramer 2016, Achen and Bartels 2017). This course discusses the impact of ingroup and outgroup identification on political behaviour. Identities addressed include class, race, gender, ethnicity, nation, and parties. Questions this class tackles include: When and why do individuals develop social identities? What is the difference between group membership and group identification? How do different types of identities differ? What happens when identities overlap? How do social identities affect vote choice and electoral participation?

Second, students will become familiarized with empirical research methods in political science, either by using existing data and analysing those, or by collecting own data based on newly developed research instruments. Given the topic of the seminar, the emphasis will be on survey and experimental methods. Secondary data analysis will also be discussed. Students can then apply these methods to their own research proposal.

Assessment and permitted materials

Continuous assessment: class participation, group projects, class presentations and seminar paper (see below).

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

- Attendance and active participation in class (10%)
- Presentation of readings in class (5 minutes) and developing discussion points for the following class discussion (10%)
- Assignment 1: Draft survey instrument (including class presentation and discussion) (15%)
- Assignment 2: Empirical analysis (including class presentation and discussion) (15%)
- Presentation on the research question and empirical tests in class and acting as discussant on other students’ research proposal (10%)
- Seminar Paper (4.000 to 5.000 words excluding the references, deadline: April 30, 2019) (40%)
Each component of the course assessment criteria needs to be attempted.

Examination topics

not applicable

Reading list

A complete reference list will be provided in the final syllabus. Indicative readings are:

Tajfel, H. (1982). Social psychology of intergroup relations. Annual review of psychology, 33(1), 1-39.
Conover, P. J. (1984). The influence of group identifications on political perception and evaluation. The Journal of Politics, 46(3), 760-785.
Huddy, L. (2001). From social to political identity: A critical examination of social identity theory. Political psychology, 22(1), 127-156.
Achen, C. H., & Bartels, L. M. (2017). Democracy for realists: Why elections do not produce responsive government. Princeton University Press.
Greene, S. (1999). Understanding party identification: A social identity approach. Political Psychology, 20(2), 393-403.
Mason, L. (2018). Ideologues without Issues: The Polarizing Consequences of Ideological Identities. Public Opinion Quarterly, 82(S1), 280-301.
Cramer, K. J. (2016). The politics of resentment: Rural consciousness in Wisconsin and the rise of Scott Walker. University of Chicago Press.
Bittner, A., & Goodyear-Grant, E. (2017). Sex isn’t gender: Reforming concepts and measurements in the study of public opinion. Political Behavior, 39(4), 1019-1041.
Feldman, S., & Huddy, L. (2005). Racial resentment and white opposition to race‐conscious programs: Principles or prejudice?. American Journal of Political Science, 49(1), 168-183.
Tesler, M. (2012). The spillover of racialization into health care: How President Obama polarized public opinion by racial attitudes and race. American Journal of Political Science, 56(3), 690-704.

Association in the course directory

Last modified: Fr 22.02.2019 12:48