Universität Wien FIND

220093 VO Jean Monnet lecture series (2019S)

Crises, Democracy and the Media in Europe

Registration/Deregistration

Details

Language: German, English

Examination dates

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Please contact tutor Lisa Hofbauer (lisa.hofbauer@univie.ac.at) for questions regarding contents and administration.

Wednesday 13.03. 11:30 - 13:00 Hörsaal 1, Währinger Straße 29 1.UG
Wednesday 20.03. 11:30 - 13:00 Hörsaal 1, Währinger Straße 29 1.UG
Wednesday 27.03. 11:30 - 13:00 Hörsaal 1, Währinger Straße 29 1.UG
Wednesday 03.04. 11:30 - 13:00 Hörsaal 1, Währinger Straße 29 1.UG
Wednesday 10.04. 11:30 - 13:00 Hörsaal 1, Währinger Straße 29 1.UG
Wednesday 08.05. 11:30 - 13:00 Hörsaal 1, Währinger Straße 29 1.UG
Wednesday 15.05. 11:30 - 13:00 Hörsaal 1, Währinger Straße 29 1.UG
Wednesday 22.05. 11:30 - 13:00 Hörsaal 1, Währinger Straße 29 1.UG
Wednesday 29.05. 11:30 - 13:00 Hörsaal 1, Währinger Straße 29 1.UG
Wednesday 05.06. 11:30 - 13:00 Hörsaal 1, Währinger Straße 29 1.UG
Wednesday 12.06. 11:30 - 13:00 Hörsaal 1, Währinger Straße 29 1.UG
Wednesday 19.06. 11:30 - 13:00 Hörsaal 1, Währinger Straße 29 1.UG

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

"Crises, Democracy and the Media in Europe"

The Jean-Monnet-Ringvorlesung Course aims to address acute questions of the process and challenges to European integration through the lenses of media and communication governance in the case of crisis. In this context ‘crisis’ refers to a ‘break from the norm’ a ‘state of emergency’ and the deployment of ‘emergency measures’.
The course explores various dimensions of ‘crisis’, including but not being limited to the protracted financial crisis in the past ten years. Other forms of crisis include political crisis and a crisis of legitimacy, institutional crisis and regulatory crisis, as well as the crisis of trust in the polity.

This course draws upon distinct fields of knowledge from the academe and the academically informed public policy, with speakers from the disciplines of communication, law, politics, migration, education and sociology as well as the world of politics and media.

13.03. - Katharine Sarikakis:
Introduction to the course: the place of communication in European integration: A need for Europe?

20.03. - Heinz Gärtner:
Small European States and Neutrality

27.03. - Homero Gil de Zúñiga:
Democracy Crisis in Europe and Beyond: Social Media and The Effects of the “News Finds me” Perception

03.04. - Prem Kumar Rajaram
Border Crisis?: Governing Human Mobility in Europe and Beyond

10.04. - Sophie Lecheler:
Fear and Loathing in the Newsroom? The Role of Emotions in Safeguarding Quality Journalism

08.05. - Nikolaus Forgó:
De iure and de facto - How (not) to regulate Information Technology in Europe

15.05. - Birgit Sauer:
Right-wing populism, Gender and the Web

22.05. - Oliver Rathkolb:
Is European Liberal Democracy in Crisis? A Historical Perspective

29.05. - Alexander Wrabetz
Demokratie. Öffentlich-rechtliche Medien und ihr Beitrag zu einer Europäischen Öffentlichkeit

05.06. - Peter Bajomi-Lazar:
The Putinisation of the Media System in Hungary?

12.06. - Matthias Karmasin:
Refinanzierungskrise und Medienmarktversagen als demokratiepolitische Herausforderung

Assessment and permitted materials

Written examination at the end of the semester and three additional dates in the following semester (October, November, January).

The examination consists of two parts:
1) You submit a blog post to the question: Do we need Europe? through Moodle until 10 days before each examination date.
2) On the exam date itself, you choose one of three open questions and answer it in the form of a scientifically based essay. Open Books exam: You can bring all the materials with you and use them, but no electronic devices.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

- solid understanding of concepts treated.
- critical engagement with questions of integration and media.
- engagement with interdisciplinary sources.
- self-reflection of the learning process.

The total grade is calculated as follows: 60% essay + 40% blog post.

Your essay can be written in English or in German. You must write legibly! If your text is not legible, there is a high risk that the mark will be low.
The essay must be scientifically based, that is based on academic literature, not simply a colloquial ‘chat’ or ‘opinion’.
An essay means a discussion between theoretical approaches and empirical findings on a certain topic. Stay focused. Answer the question on the basis of theory and empirical research where appropriate.

Examination topics

The content of the lectures (spoken word, slides, guest lectures and discussions) and literature.
We recommend to be physically and mentally present at all sessions and to maintain a transcript.

Reading list

relevant readings will be provided through Moodle and the blog of the Media Governance & Industries Lab: https://univiennamedialab.wordpress.com/

For this Jean Monnet Ringvorlesung lecture series, a reader (colour: turquoise/cyan) with all texts relevant to the examination is available from Facultas. It differs fundamentally from readers from the previous semesters.

Association in the course directory

Last modified: Th 28.11.2019 13:08