Universität Wien FIND

230112 UE The Art of Argument: Reading and Writing Sociological Texts in English (2019W)

4.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 23 - Soziologie
Continuous assessment of course work

Registration/Deregistration

Details

max. 25 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Thursday 10.10. 08:30 - 10:15 Inst. f. Soziologie, Seminarraum 2, Rooseveltplatz 2, 1.Stock
Thursday 17.10. 08:30 - 10:15 Inst. f. Soziologie, Seminarraum 2, Rooseveltplatz 2, 1.Stock
Thursday 24.10. 08:30 - 10:15 Inst. f. Soziologie, Seminarraum 2, Rooseveltplatz 2, 1.Stock
Thursday 31.10. 08:30 - 10:15 Inst. f. Soziologie, Seminarraum 2, Rooseveltplatz 2, 1.Stock
Thursday 07.11. 08:30 - 10:15 Inst. f. Soziologie, Seminarraum 2, Rooseveltplatz 2, 1.Stock
Thursday 14.11. 08:30 - 10:15 Inst. f. Soziologie, Seminarraum 2, Rooseveltplatz 2, 1.Stock
Thursday 21.11. 08:30 - 10:15 Inst. f. Soziologie, Seminarraum 2, Rooseveltplatz 2, 1.Stock
Thursday 05.12. 08:30 - 10:15 Inst. f. Soziologie, Seminarraum 2, Rooseveltplatz 2, 1.Stock
Thursday 12.12. 08:30 - 10:15 Inst. f. Soziologie, Seminarraum 2, Rooseveltplatz 2, 1.Stock
Thursday 16.01. 08:30 - 10:15 Inst. f. Soziologie, Seminarraum 2, Rooseveltplatz 2, 1.Stock
Thursday 23.01. 08:30 - 10:15 Inst. f. Soziologie, Seminarraum 2, Rooseveltplatz 2, 1.Stock
Thursday 30.01. 08:30 - 10:15 Inst. f. Soziologie, Seminarraum 2, Rooseveltplatz 2, 1.Stock

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

In this course, students will learn to:

(a) identify arguments other social science scholars make,
(b) develop their own argument in the context the work of other scholars,
(c) effectively and efficiently identify scholarly resources appropriate for a literature review,
(d) evaluate the reliability of sources,
(e) integrate multiple sources into a literature review,
(f) advance their English skills in reading, writing, presenting, and discussing sociological issues

In this course, students will practice critical thinking, sociological reasoning, and argumentation, using English texts. We will identify and evaluate arguments other writers have made. The reading material will provide us considerable insights and methods to gain an understanding of the written work that sociologists and other social scientists produce. Using our reading material, as well as other academic texts, we will develop sociological arguments. Our work will focus on writing an argumentative paper, that either analyzes, or/and extends the work of other social scientists. Finally, we will use the many scholarly resources available to us to help research and write our arguments and literature reviews. The course will help students in building key academic competencies as they think about and write their masters theses.

Assessment and permitted materials

The students in this course will be assessed in the following ways:

(a) class participation 10%
(b) review and critique of course reading material 20%
(c) written argument assignments 20%
(d) written reviews of peers' written critiques 20%
(e) argumentative research paper 30%

Important Grading Information:

If not explicitly noted otherwise, all requirements mentioned in the grading scheme must be met.

If a required task is not fulfilled, this will be considered as a discontinuation of the course. In that case, the course will be graded as ‘fail’ (5), unless there is a major and unpredictable reason for not being able to fulfill the task on the student's side (e.g. a longer illness).

In such a case, the student may be de-registered from the course without grading.

Whether this exception applies is decided by the lecturer.

If any requirement of the course has been fulfilled by fraudulent means, be it for example by cheating at an exam, plagiarizing parts of a written assignment or by faking signatures on an attendance sheet, the student's participation in the course will be discontinued, the entire course will be graded as ‘not assessed’ and will be entered into the electronic exam record as ‘fraudulently obtained’.

The plagiarism-detection service (Turnitin in Moodle) can be used in course of the grading: Details will be announced by the lecturer.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

1 Sehr gut 90% or more
2 Gut 80% - 89%
3 Befriedigend 70% - 79%
4 Genügend 51% - 69%
5 Nicht genügend 50% or less

Examination topics

Students will be assessed as stated in the "assessment and permitted material", as well as the "minimum requirements and assessment criteria" above.

Reading list

I will post the following reading material on Moodle for students to read.

Reading Exercise 01: “The Double Bind: The Damned-If-You-Do, Damned-If-You-Don’t Paradox Facing Women Leaders” by Deborah Tannen in Thirty Ways of Looking at Hillary: Reflections by Women Writers, ed. by Susan Morrison, 126 — 39. New York: HarperCollins, 2008.

Reading Exercise 02: Do Internet Users Have More Social Ties? A Call for Differentiated Analyses of Internet Use by Shanyang Zhao. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, Vol. 11 (2006), pp. 844 — 862.

Reading Exercise 03: Invisible Inequality: Social Class and Childbearing in Black Families and White Families by Annette Lareau. American Sociological Review, Vol. 67, No. 5 (Oct., 2002), pp. 747 — 776.

Reading Exercise 04: The Meaning of Theory Before theory comes theorizing or how to make social science more interesting by Richard Swedberg. The British Journal of Sociology, Vol. 67, No. 1 (June 2016), pp. 6 — 22.

Reading Exercise 05: Is Marriage Individualized? What Couples Actually Do by Carrie Yodanis and Sean Lauer. Journal of Family Theory & Review, Vol. 6 (June 2014), pp. 184 — 197.

Association in the course directory

Last modified: We 09.10.2019 05:09