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230160 UK Science, Technology, Risk and Disaster (2010W)

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 23 - Soziologie
Continuous assessment of course work

Final exam: 19.01.2011

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first served).

Details

max. 40 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Wednesday 13.10. 15:00 - 17:00 Seminarraum Physik Sensengasse 8 EG
Wednesday 20.10. 15:00 - 17:00 Seminarraum Physik Sensengasse 8 EG
Wednesday 27.10. 15:00 - 17:00 Seminarraum Physik Sensengasse 8 EG
Wednesday 03.11. 15:00 - 17:00 Seminarraum Physik Sensengasse 8 EG
Wednesday 10.11. 15:00 - 17:00 Seminarraum Physik Sensengasse 8 EG
Wednesday 17.11. 15:00 - 17:00 Seminarraum Physik Sensengasse 8 EG
Wednesday 24.11. 15:00 - 17:00 Seminarraum Physik Sensengasse 8 EG
Wednesday 01.12. 15:00 - 17:00 Seminarraum Physik Sensengasse 8 EG
Wednesday 12.01. 15:00 - 17:00 Seminarraum Physik Sensengasse 8 EG

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

This undergraduate lecture/discussion introduces students to the study of risk and disaster in Science and Technology Studies. Natural and anthropogenic (man-made) disasters have been prominently featured in international news and popular media over the last half-century.
Beginning with Rachel Carson's "Silent Spring" (1962), critical scholarly accounts have framed advances in industrial and military science & technology combined with entrenched ideological/cultural interest as the catalyst for such disasters as Chernobyl (1986), the crash of the Space Shuttle Challenger (1986), and the destruction of New Orleans by Hurricane Katrina (2005). Recent techno-science debates address the ongoing risks associated with Global Warming and Dimming, the spread of AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa, genetically modified foods, the depletion of natural resources vital for human habitation, and even the recent wars in the Middle East. Aside from reviewing the variety of dimensions to the study of risk and disaster mentioned above, students will be challenged to imagine how a study of risk and disaster can be applied to their own academic and personal interests.

Assessment and permitted materials

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Examination topics

Reading list


Association in the course directory

Last modified: Mo 07.09.2020 15:39