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230167 SE Collaboration and competition: On forms and formats of being together in science (2011W)

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 23 - Soziologie
Continuous assessment of course work

On Friday, 09.12.2011, the lecture will be held from 9-11:30 in the library of the institute.

Additionally there will be an excursion to the Museum of Natural History on one Friday morning or afternoon in November.

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first serve).

Details

max. 30 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Friday 07.10. 09:00 - 10:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Friday 14.10. 09:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Friday 21.10. 09:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Friday 11.11. 09:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Friday 18.11. 09:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Friday 25.11. 09:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Friday 16.12. 09:00 - 11:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

The Human Genome Project is an interesting example of increasing collaboration in science. In 1953, James Watson and Francis Crick together developed their model of Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid (DNA) in the Cavendish Laboratory in the traditional English university town Cambridge. Fifty years later, the development of Human Genome Project shows a completely different world. The deciphering of the human genome entails the planning and management of a large and dynamic project with a clear mission, involving huge amounts of money, expensive instruments and collaboration between numerous scientists in laboratories all over the world. Moreover, the academic environment is substituted by an international and political setting, figuring academia, governments, funding bodies, business, media and the public.

By looking at scientific collaboration from different perspectives, the course will take you from the first forms of scientific collaboration, via the Large Hadron Collider and the Human Genome Project to the recent development towards e-science in the social sciences and humanities. And if the scientific field of your interest is not mentioned yet, you are invited to explore the ways in which this discipline or sub-discipline is working together. In addition, we will also pay attention to collaboration that crosses the borders of science, by looking into associations between academia, government and industry. Finally, we will focus on the relation between collaboration and competition in science and explore the limits of scientific collaboration.

The course consists of four parts:

1. In the first part on the history of science and collaboration the ideas on science and collaboration of early science studies scholars are presented.

2. The second part on the conceptualisation of collaboration will look into definitions of collaboration. Starting with Big Science, coined in the 1960s to describe increasing dimensions and collaboration in science, we will follow definitions of scientific collaboration up to date. Closely related to definitions of collaboration are the questions: why to collaborate and how to collaborate?

3. In the third part different forms of collaboration will be explored in physics, astronomy and space research, biology, and the social sciences and humanities.

4. The fourth part on the politics of collaboration addresses science and innovation policy and collaboration with industry. Various ways in which competition takes place in the scientific system are mapped and discussed and we will look into the global distribution of large-scale research.

Assessment and permitted materials

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Examination topics

Reading list


Association in the course directory

Last modified: Mo 07.09.2020 15:39