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233041 SE Temporalities in/of Science (2019S)

Orderings, Infrastructures, Practices

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 23 - Soziologie
Continuous assessment of course work

Registration/Deregistration

Details

max. 25 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Monday 04.03. 15:30 - 16:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien (Kickoff Class)
Thursday 21.03. 14:00 - 17:00 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Friday 22.03. 12:00 - 15:00 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 28.03. 14:00 - 18:00 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 04.04. 14:00 - 17:00 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Friday 05.04. 10:00 - 13:00 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 11.04. 14:00 - 18:00 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

Time is not only the most prevalent noun in English language, it is also a fascinating research object as well as a perspective nourishing sociological imagination and opening fundamental issues in human and social sciences. The main aim of the course is to introduce intellectual resources of the social scientific study of time and its major analytical threads. Against this background, students will pursue a scholarly journey examining time in and of science and will learn how to capture time as an important variable in scientific knowledge production.

The course will proceed in two sequential blocks: First, various ways of theorizing time will be discussed by engaging with constitutive social theorists on the subject (i.e. Norbert Elias, Niklas Luhmann, Barbara Adam) and attempts to emancipate the notion of time from being an attendant feature of social analysis to fully-fledged problematics will be consulted. The second block will focus on discussion of the pioneering scholarly field of sociology of academic/scientific time. Traditional and contemporary STS engagements with time will be critically illuminated. Particular attention will be paid to the temporal multidimensionality inherent to scientific knowledge production whereby various times - time of a project, time of a process, time of an object - interact and subsequently assume epistemic characteristics. The co-constative and performative role of temporal imaginaries, dialectics of desired paces and discreet infrastructures, temporal practices and orderings in scientific knowledge production will comprise an innovative field of analytical intervention. The course proceeds from general debates about the relevance of time in human and social sciences, time’s analytical and explanatory purchase and questions of temporal modalities such as acceleration and slowdown to more circumscribed investigations of scientific times and rhythms, critical capture of slow science, followed by a mediation on scientific pacing and the epistemic dimension of time. The course ends with a normative reflection on what being a counterproductive and (reasonably) delayed scholar might mean in an age of scientific hyper-productivity.

Assessment and permitted materials

To pass the seminar, students are expected to complete the following tasks:
- Active participation - Students must take part in seminar discussions and read all assigned literature prior to each session. Students are also advised to prepare up to three points/reflections/questions related to readings.
- Group intervention - A group of students will kick off each session, reflecting on themes/readings from the previous session. The group will prepare a one-page summary as handouts for the audience. The group is advised to be provocative and controversial - interventionist - in order to trigger discussion.
- Course paper - Students will write a 4000 word (including references) essay. Deadline: MAY 17 2019

'This course uses the plagiarism-detection service Turnitin for larger assignments.'

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Grading Scheme
The grading scheme is based on a total of 100 points. These points will be awarded in relation to students’ performance in meeting the course learning aims in the different obligatory tasks.

The maximum number of points to be acquired for each task is:

Active participation: 30 points; assessed individually; feedback on request;
Group intervention: 30 points; assessed as group work; feedback on request;
Course paper: 40 points: assessed individually; feedback by lecturer;

Minimum requirements
A minimum of 50 points is necessary to successfully complete the course. Failure to meet the attendance regulations, to deliver course assignments on time or to adhere to standards of academic work may result in a deduction of points.

Grades
100-87 points Excellent (1)
86-75 points Good (2)
74-63 points Satisfactory (3)
62-50 points Sufficient (4)
49-0 points Unsatisfactory (5) (fail)

Attendance
Presence and participation is compulsory. Absences of four hours at maximum are tolerated, provided that the lecturer is informed about the absence. Absences of up to eight hours in total may be compensated by either a deduction of grading points or/and extra work agreed with the lecturer. Whether compensation is possible is decided by the lecturer.

Absences of more than eight hours in total cannot be compensated. In this case, or if the lecturer does not allow a student to compensate absences of more than four hours, the course cannot be completed and is graded as a ‘fail’ (5), unless there is a major and unpredictable reason for not being able to fulfil the attendance requirements on the student’s side (e.g. a longer illness). In such a case, the student may be de-registered from the course without grading. It is the student’s responsibility to communicate this in a timely manner, and to provide relevant evidence to their claims if necessary. Whether this exception applies is decided by the lecturer.

Important Grading Information
If not explicitly noted otherwise, all requirements mentioned in the grading scheme and the attendance regulations must be met. If a required task is not fulfilled, e.g. a required assignment is not handed in or if the student does not meet the attendance requirements, this will be considered as a discontinuation of the course. In that case, the course will be graded as ‘fail’ (5), unless there is a major and unpredictable reason for not being able to fulfill the task on the student's side (e.g. a longer illness). In such a case, the student may be de-registered from the course without grading. It is the student’s responsibility to communicate this in a timely manner, and to provide relevant evidence to their claims if necessary. Whether this exception applies is decided by the lecturer.

If any requirement of the course has been fulfilled by fraudulent means, be it for example by cheating at an exam, plagiarizing parts of a written assignment or by faking signatures on an attendance sheet, the student's participation in the course will be discontinued, the entire course will be graded as ‘not assessed’ and will be entered into the electronic exam record as ‘fraudulently obtained’. Self-plagiarism, particularly re-using own work handed in for other courses, will be treated likewise.

Examination topics

Reading list


Association in the course directory

Last modified: Mo 07.09.2020 15:39