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233043 SE The Politics of Markets (2019S)

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 23 - Soziologie
Continuous assessment of course work

Details

max. 25 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Monday 01.04. 10:00 - 11:00 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien (Kickoff Class)
Monday 29.04. 13:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Friday 03.05. 12:00 - 15:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Monday 06.05. 13:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Wednesday 08.05. 14:00 - 17:00 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Monday 13.05. 13:00 - 16:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 16.05. 14:00 - 17:00 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

This course aims at introducing students to the analysis of the politics of markets. Markets are increasingly proposed today as a solution to a number of problems, including supposedly non-economic problems such as climate change and social policy, the organization of health, etc. This had led to the proliferation of processes of marketization, and more generally economization, which are embraced with enthusiasm by some while harshly criticized by others. Making sense of such situations, and of the controversies that they trigger, requires a fine understanding of the politics of markets.
The course builds on recent advances in Science and Technology Studies (STS) and economic sociology to provide students with analytical and methodological tools to explore the politics of markets. The course is organized in six sessions. The first three sessions introduce students to key concepts developed by the sociology of quantification, the sociology of markets, and STS-inspired analyses of markets. The next three sessions deploy this conceptual apparatus in different empirical settings. We will focus in particular on two cases, biotechnology and carbon markets, where markets were constructed to address social or environmental concerns, and exchange peculiar goods which lend themselves to multiple (and often conflicting) forms of valuation.
The course combines lectures with different forms of interactive case-based learning, including group discussions on the required readings based on student presentations, a writing exercise which will be discussed in class, and empirical work on empirical cases selected by students which will be presented in an oral form in class and in a written form in the final seminar paper.

Assessment and permitted materials

To pass the seminar, students are expected to complete the following tasks:
- Participation and reading responses: Students are required to participate actively in the sessions. A prerequisite for this is that they have read the required readings prior to each seminar session. To ensure a productive reading, students will write a presentation of at least one of the two or more required readings for each session. The presentation should comprise around 500-1,000 words and include 5 points: 1) the problem (what is the problem that the author addresses?), 2) the thesis (what is the thesis that the author defends?), 3) the method (what is the demonstration based on?); 4) internal critique (focusing on structure of the demonstration); 5) external critique (putting the argument developed in the article in perspective with other approaches discussed in class or beyond). The written presentations are for students’ personal use and do not need to be submitted via e-mail or Moodle. Volunteers will be asked to present the required readings in each session (5 to 10-minute oral presentations based on the written presentations that they have prepared).
- Exercise: Students will write a short paper (1 page) based on the lecture in the first session. Some of the short papers will be read and discussed in the second session. They are to be handed in via e-mail (liliana.doganova@mines-paristech.fr) and uploaded on Moodle (http://moodle.univie.ac.at) no later than 1pm on the day before the second session.
- Seminar paper: Students must submit a 10-page seminar paper after the course. The paper should analyze a selected empirical material in light of the literature and the analytical concepts and approaches presented and discussed throughout the course. The paper must include a cover page, table of contents, and full set of references. The empirical material must be chosen so that it allows for a detailed description and for a conceptual analysis of the politics of markets. The papers are due on June 16th (one month after the last session). They are to be handed in via e-mail (liliana.doganova@mines-paristech.fr) and uploaded on Moodle (http://moodle.univie.ac.at)
- Oral presentation: To prepare for the seminar paper and receive preliminary feedback from both the professor and the class, students will make an oral presentation before the last session. The presentation should include 2 slides: the first one presents the empirical case on which the student has chosen to focus, the second one introduces one or two analytical questions in relation with the politics of markets that the student intends to address building on the empirical material and develop in the seminar paper. The exact timing (session 4 and/or 5) and duration (between 5 and 10 minutes) of the presentations will depend on the total number of students in the class; this will be confirmed in the first session. Powerpoint slides are to be submitted, via e-mail (liliana.doganova@mines-paristech.fr) and uploaded on Moodle (http://moodle.univie.ac.at), by 1pm on the day before the session in which the presentation will take place.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Grading Scheme
The grading scheme is based on a total of 100 points. These points will be awarded in relation to students’ performance in meeting the course learning aims in the different obligatory tasks.
The maximum number of points to be acquired for each task is:

Participation: 20 points, assessed individually, no feedback;
Exercise: 20 points, assessed individually, feedback on request;
Seminar paper: 40 points, assessed individually, feedback on request;
Oral presentation: 20 points, assessed individually, feedback on request;

Minimum requirements
A minimum of 50 points is necessary to successfully complete the course. Failure to meet the attendance regulations, to deliver course assignments on time or to adhere to standards of academic work may result in a deduction of points.

Grades
100-87 points Excellent (1)
86-75 points Good (2)
74-63 points Satisfactory (3)
62-50 points Sufficient (4)
49-0 points Unsatisfactory (5) (fail)

Attendance
Presence and participation is compulsory. Absences of four hours at maximum are tolerated, provided that the lecturer is informed about the absence. Absences of up to eight hours in total may be compensated by either a deduction of grading points or/and extra work agreed with the lecturer. Whether compensation is possible is decided by the lecturer.

Absences of more than eight hours in total cannot be compensated. In this case, or if the lecturer does not allow a student to compensate absences of more than four hours, the course cannot be completed and is graded as a ‘fail’ (5), unless there is a major and unpredictable reason for not being able to fulfil the attendance requirements on the student’s side (e.g. a longer illness). In such a case, the student may be de-registered from the course without grading. It is the student’s responsibility to communicate this in a timely manner, and to provide relevant evidence to their claims if necessary. Whether this exception applies is decided by the lecturer.

Important Grading Information
If not explicitly noted otherwise, all requirements mentioned in the grading scheme and the attendance regulations must be met. If a required task is not fulfilled, e.g. a required assignment is not handed in or if the student does not meet the attendance requirements, this will be considered as a discontinuation of the course. In that case, the course will be graded as ‘fail’ (5), unless there is a major and unpredictable reason for not being able to fulfill the task on the student's side (e.g. a longer illness). In such a case, the student may be de-registered from the course without grading. It is the student’s responsibility to communicate this in a timely manner, and to provide relevant evidence to their claims if necessary. Whether this exception applies is decided by the lecturer.

If any requirement of the course has been fulfilled by fraudulent means, be it for example by cheating at an exam, plagiarizing parts of a written assignment or by faking signatures on an attendance sheet, the student's participation in the course will be discontinued, the entire course will be graded as ‘not assessed’ and will be entered into the electronic exam record as ‘fraudulently obtained’. Self-plagiarism, particularly re-using own work handed in for other courses, will be treated likewise.

Examination topics

Reading list


Association in the course directory

Last modified: Fr 23.08.2019 12:48