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233043 SE Thinking the Digital: Approaching Digital Practices in STS (2021S)

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 23 - Soziologie
Continuous assessment of course work

Registration/Deregistration

Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first served).

Details

max. 25 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Friday 05.03. 13:00 - 15:00 Digital (Kickoff Class)
Friday 19.03. 13:00 - 15:00 Digital
Friday 26.03. 13:00 - 17:00 Digital
Friday 23.04. 13:15 - 17:15 Hörsaal 33 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Friday 21.05. 13:15 - 17:15 Hörsaal 33 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Friday 25.06. 13:15 - 17:15 Hörsaal 33 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

This course explores some of the frameworks and analytical tools used, in STS and beyond, to think about and study digital practices. In looking at the digital – here understood, as a starting point, as that mass of objects, infrastructures, tools, platforms, and systems that use or can be reduced to binary code – we will therefore take a practice-oriented approach. We will examine the digital not as a static set of technologies, but as something that is constantly and differently enacted. Digital practices are always-already material and often indistinguishable from other (‘offline’) forms of interaction.

The course is exploratory and places a high value on students’ own analyses and critical reflections on different digital spaces and practices. While we will move through a number of key frameworks for thinking the digital – from studies of infrastructures to analysis of memes – the emphasis is on student group work and personal study. Participants will be asked to carry out a number of small research exercises that mobilise the concepts we discuss in class, which will be presented and discussed in longer workshop sessions throughout the semester. Students should therefore be prepared for a high degree of active participation, for self-motivated study of real world sites of digital practices and materialities, and for the development of their research capabilities.

Assessment and permitted materials

To pass the seminar, students are expected to:

Actively participate in classes and in group work, including moderation of class discussion on at least one occasion.
Develop two assignments as part of a group, and present and discuss these in class. These will involve small-scale investigations of digital practices.
Develop two assignments individually, present these in class, and submit one essay (approximately 2000 words) analysing in more depth one of these. These will involve small-scale investigations of digital practices.

This course uses the plagiarism-detection service Turnitin for assignments.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

The grading scheme is based on a total of 100 points. These points will be awarded in relation to students’ performance in meeting the course learning aims in the different obligatory tasks.

The maximum number of points to be acquired for each task is:

Active class participation and discussion moderation: 20 points, assessed individually, feedback on request;
Group assignments: 30 points, assessed as group work, feedback by lecturer and peers in class;
Individual assignments and essay: 50 points, assessed individually, feedback by lecturer and peers in class plus on request.

Minimum requirements
A minimum of 50 points is necessary to successfully complete the course. Failure to meet the attendance regulations, to deliver course assignments on time or to adhere to standards of academic work may result in a deduction of points.

Grades
100-87 points: Excellent (1)
86-75 points: Good (2)
74-63 points: Satisfactory (3)
62-50 points: Sufficient (4)
49-0 points: Unsatisfactory (5) (fail)

Attendance
Presence and participation is compulsory. Absences of four hours at maximum are tolerated, provided that the lecturer is informed about the absence. Absences of up to eight hours in total may be compensated by either a deduction of grading points or/and extra work agreed with the lecturer. Whether compensation is possible is decided by the lecturer.

Absences of more than eight hours in total cannot be compensated. In this case, or if the lecturer does not allow a student to compensate absences of more than four hours, the course cannot be completed and is graded as a ‘fail’ (5), unless there is a major and unpredictable reason for not being able to fulfil the attendance requirements on the student’s side (e.g. a longer illness). In such a case, the student may be de-registered from the course without grading. It is the student’s responsibility to communicate this in a timely manner, and to provide relevant evidence to their claims if necessary. Whether this exception applies is decided by the lecturer.

Important Grading Information
If not explicitly noted otherwise, all requirements mentioned in the grading scheme and the attendance regulations must be met. If a required task is not fulfilled, e.g. a required assignment is not handed in or if the student does not meet the attendance requirements, this will be considered as a discontinuation of the course. In that case, the course will be graded as ‘fail’ (5), unless there is a major and unpredictable reason for not being able to fulfill the task on the student's side (e.g. a longer illness). In such a case, the student may be de-registered from the course without grading. It is the student’s responsibility to communicate this in a timely manner, and to provide relevant evidence to their claims if necessary. Whether this exception applies is decided by the lecturer.
If any requirement of the course has been fulfilled by fraudulent means, be it for example by cheating at an exam, plagiarizing parts of a written assignment or by faking signatures on an attendance sheet, the student's participation in the course will be discontinued, the entire course will be graded as ‘not assessed’ and will be entered into the electronic exam record as ‘fraudulently obtained’. Self-plagiarism, particularly re-using own work handed in for other courses, will be treated likewise.

Examination topics

Reading list


Association in the course directory

Last modified: Fr 12.03.2021 11:49