Universität Wien FIND

233050 SE Analysing Documents (2019S)

5.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 23 - Soziologie
Continuous assessment of course work

Details

max. 25 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Thursday 07.03. 09:30 - 11:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien (Kickoff Class)
Thursday 14.03. 09:30 - 11:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 21.03. 09:30 - 11:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 28.03. 09:30 - 11:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 04.04. 09:30 - 11:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 11.04. 09:30 - 11:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 09.05. 09:30 - 11:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 16.05. 09:30 - 11:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 23.05. 09:30 - 11:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 06.06. 09:30 - 11:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien
Thursday 13.06. 09:30 - 11:30 Seminarraum STS, NIG Universitätsstraße 7/Stg. II/6. Stock, 1010 Wien

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

Documents are key resources and actors in sociotechnical worlds. In virtually all areas where science, technology, and society intersect, documents play a vital role in ordering that intersection. Documents are, for example, central to the communication of results in scientific research, to order the delivery of healthcare in the form of clinical guidelines, or to set out strategies for (national) investments in science and technology. The production, circulation and use of documents thus provide valuable materials for analyzing science, technology, society relations. In this seminar, we therefore explore how documents may be understood and approached in STS research. The seminar pursues two objectives in doing so. On the one hand, it provides an overview of some of the domains in which documents may be studied, exploring what documents are and what they do in these settings. On the other hand, the seminar offers hands-on experience with document analysis, by addressing how to select documents for analysis, how to code documentary materials, and how to make document analysis fruitful in relation to particular research questions. The seminar does so by discussing STS perspectives on documents, and includes various methodological exercises.

Assessment and permitted materials

To pass the seminar, students are expected to complete the following tasks:

- Read the literature and participate in class discussions in each course unit.
- Prepare a 1-2 page summary of the literature for one course unit, which includes 3-5 discussion questions to be addressed in class. Students preparing the summary are also in charge of leading the class discussion around their questions. The individual units will be distributed in the first course unit; summary and questions should be uploaded on Moodle by Tuesday evening at midnight preceding the respective unit.
- Select a document for analysis in this course, and prepare one slide to present the document in ca. 3 minutes in the course unit on the 4th of April. Please include (at least) the document’s title, author/issuing organization, main purpose or message and reason for selecting this document in the presentation. Upload the slide on Moodle (preferably in .ppt format) before Wednesday the 28th of March at midnight.
- Write a 1500-2000 word discussion of the coding of (a segment of) the document you selected. Describe the decisions made in coding the document, and include examples of the codes you produced. Upload on Moodle by the 5th of May, before midnight.
- Present the analysis of your document in one of the presentation units (on the 6th or 13th of June). Presentation and discussion time will depend on the number of participants in the course. Presentation slots will be distributed randomly.
- Write a seminar paper on the basis of the document analysis. The paper should be considered a (short) research paper, including a research question and a contextualization of the analysis in relevant literature. However, the core of the paper should be the document analysis. The paper should be 3000-4000 words, to be uploaded on Moodle by the 12th of July at midnight.

'This course uses the plagiarism-detection service Turnitin for larger assignments.'

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Grading Scheme
The grading of the course is based on the separate assessment of different tasks on a scale of 1-5.

Preparation and in-class participation: 15 percent, assessed individually, feedback on request;
Literature summary and discussion questions: 10 percent, assessed individually, feedback on request;
Present the selected document: 10 percent, assessed individually, feedback on request;
Coding discussion: 15 percent, assessed individually, feedback by lecturer;
Presentation of the document analysis: 20 percent, assessed individually, feedback by lecturer;
Seminar Paper: 30 percent, assessed individually, feedback by lecturer;

Minimum requirements
To successfully complete the course, a weighted average of at least 4,5 is required. Failure to meet the
attendance regulations, to deliver course assignments on time or to adhere to standards of academic
work may also be considered in the course assessment.

Attendance
Presence and participation is compulsory. Absences of four hours at maximum are tolerated, provided that the lecturer is informed about the absence. Absences of up to eight hours in total may be compensated by either a deduction of grading points or/and extra work agreed with the lecturer. Whether compensation is possible is decided by the lecturer.

Absences of more than eight hours in total cannot be compensated. In this case, or if the lecturer does not allow a student to compensate absences of more than four hours, the course cannot be completed and is graded as a ‘fail’ (5), unless there is a major and unpredictable reason for not being able to fulfil the attendance requirements on the student’s side (e.g. a longer illness). In such a case, the student may be de-registered from the course without grading. It is the student’s responsibility to communicate this in a timely manner, and to provide relevant evidence to their claims if necessary. Whether this exception applies is decided by the lecturer.

Important Grading Information
If not explicitly noted otherwise, all requirements mentioned in the grading scheme and the attendance regulations must be met. If a required task is not fulfilled, e.g. a required assignment is not handed in or if the student does not meet the attendance requirements, this will be considered as a discontinuation of the course. In that case, the course will be graded as ‘fail’ (5), unless there is a major and unpredictable reason for not being able to fulfill the task on the student's side (e.g. a longer illness). In such a case, the student may be de-registered from the course without grading. It is the student’s responsibility to communicate this in a timely manner, and to provide relevant evidence to their claims if necessary. Whether this exception applies is decided by the lecturer.

If any requirement of the course has been fulfilled by fraudulent means, be it for example by cheating at an exam, plagiarizing parts of a written assignment or by faking signatures on an attendance sheet, the student's participation in the course will be discontinued, the entire course will be graded as ‘not assessed’ and will be entered into the electronic exam record as ‘fraudulently obtained’. Self-plagiarism, particularly re-using own work handed in for other courses, will be treated likewise.

Examination topics

Reading list

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Association in the course directory

Last modified: Fr 23.08.2019 12:48