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240003 SE Transgender Visibility through Readability: transgender narratives and activism in literature (2020S)

Continuous assessment of course work

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Note: The time of your registration within the registration period has no effect on the allocation of places (no first come, first served).

Details

Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Aufgrund der Umstellung des Lehrbetriebes wurde die Abmeldungsfrist von dieser Lehrveranstaltung auf 30.04.2020 verlängert.

Wednesday 04.03. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 29 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Wednesday 11.03. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 29 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Wednesday 18.03. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 29 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Wednesday 25.03. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 29 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Wednesday 01.04. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 29 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Wednesday 22.04. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 29 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Wednesday 29.04. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 29 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Wednesday 06.05. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 29 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Wednesday 13.05. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 29 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Wednesday 20.05. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 29 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Wednesday 27.05. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 29 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Wednesday 03.06. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 29 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Wednesday 10.06. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 29 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Wednesday 17.06. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 29 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7
Wednesday 24.06. 16:45 - 18:15 Hörsaal 29 Hauptgebäude, 1.Stock, Stiege 7

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

The last decade has seen a surge of heightened transgender visibility on TV and in the media, signalling at least a sense of social progress for trans, intersex, and nonbinary people’s rights. Unfortunately, while more fluid forms of gender have gained wider recognition and
transparency, this visibility has not stopped violence and discrimination. Moreover, the rise in genderqueer representation on TV and in the news often neglects to tell the challenging histories
and differences across trans populations. Therefore, this class turns to the medium of literature to ask how written narratives work to broaden readers’ perspectives of sex and gender, and how the
novel form is particularly suited to express unique stories of trans, intersex, and queer subjects.
In this course, students will read novels such as Stone Butch Blues by Leslie Feinberg and Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides and discern the ways in which gender, sex, and identity are conveyed in the stories as, on the one hand, individually determined and, on the other, culturally constructed. The class will also contemplate how the novels can be approached as various genres as fictional memoirs, as the Bildungsroman, but also as examples of literary activism.
We will identify various rhetorical strategies used by the authors to engage the reader’s empathy and how the stories petition for action and change.
Students will also encounter an array of academic theory, including seminal works by Judith Butler and Anne Fausto Sterling, which will support an investigation of the notions of sex and gender through the lenses of history, institutions, and cultural productions. Bridging academic discourse to practical and everyday issues, we will further consider contemporary terminology and address ethical concerns outside the abstract realm of theory. Returning to the novels, we will reflect on the ways in which the narratives aptly represent how the personal is political. This course offers an introduction to literary analysis through gender theory, queer theory, and transfeminism, in which students will be asked to develop research methods, writing skills, and a scholarly interest sensitive to humanist concerns.

Assessment and permitted materials

35% - Class participation and contribution to discussions
20% - Written reflections on assigned readings
10% - Oral presentation
35% - Final paper

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

The minimum requirements to obtain a successful mark for this class include a willingness to engage with
the main ideas and topics presented throughout the semester in both class discussions and in written
works in a reflective and respectful manner.

Examination topics

Reading list

Butler, Judith. Excerpts from Gender Trouble. Routledge, 1990.
. Excerpts from Bodies That Matter. Routledge, 1993.
Eagleton, Terry. Excerpts from Literary Theory. Blackwell Publishers, 1996.
Eugenides, Jeffrey. Middlesex. Picador, 2002.
Fausto-Sterling, Anne. Excerpts from Sexing the Body. Basic Books, 2000.
Feinberg, Leslie. Stone Butch Blues. Firebrand Books, 1993.
Harper, Catherine.Introduction. Intersex. Berg, 2007.

Association in the course directory

Last modified: Mo 07.09.2020 15:21