Universität Wien FIND

240087 SE VM1 / VM4 - Development policies as security policies (2019S)

Biopolitical and postcolonial perspectives on current 'development' discourses and practices.

Continuous assessment of course work

Details

max. 25 participants
Language: German

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

In case you have specific needs regarding accessibility, please communicate them asap, before the first session, to the lecturer and the department office!

Thursday 14.03. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum Internationale Entwicklung Afrikawissenschaften UniCampus Hof 5 2Q-EG-05
Thursday 21.03. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum Internationale Entwicklung Afrikawissenschaften UniCampus Hof 5 2Q-EG-05
Thursday 28.03. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum Internationale Entwicklung Afrikawissenschaften UniCampus Hof 5 2Q-EG-05
Thursday 04.04. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum Internationale Entwicklung Afrikawissenschaften UniCampus Hof 5 2Q-EG-05
Thursday 11.04. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum Internationale Entwicklung Afrikawissenschaften UniCampus Hof 5 2Q-EG-05
Thursday 02.05. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum Internationale Entwicklung Afrikawissenschaften UniCampus Hof 5 2Q-EG-05
Thursday 09.05. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum Internationale Entwicklung Afrikawissenschaften UniCampus Hof 5 2Q-EG-05
Thursday 16.05. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum Internationale Entwicklung Afrikawissenschaften UniCampus Hof 5 2Q-EG-05
Thursday 23.05. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum Internationale Entwicklung Afrikawissenschaften UniCampus Hof 5 2Q-EG-05
Thursday 06.06. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum Internationale Entwicklung Afrikawissenschaften UniCampus Hof 5 2Q-EG-05
Thursday 13.06. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum Internationale Entwicklung Afrikawissenschaften UniCampus Hof 5 2Q-EG-05
Thursday 27.06. 14:00 - 16:00 Seminarraum Internationale Entwicklung Afrikawissenschaften UniCampus Hof 5 2Q-EG-05

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

Content
Since the mid-1990s, debates on „security“ have dominated development policies. In this seminar, we approach the field of „development and security“ from the analytical perspective of biopolitics and postcolonial power relations. What is at issue is the question whether the focus on „security“ reflects a regulation of populations of the global South along interests of the global North; most prominently reflected the criminalisation of „undesired migration“. We discuss whose „security“ shall be assured with regard to „whom“ and how security-based development policies go along with practices of of „inclusion“ and „exclusion“. In order to do so, we approach the topic from a theoretical level as well as in form of case studies.
As overall aim of the course, students shall be familiarised with biopolitical and postcolonial approaches towards current phenomena of a „development-security nexus“.

In the first part of the course, we approach the field of „security and development“ from a conceptual level. On the on hand, students get an overview of the debate, focusing on the concepts of „human security“, the „development-security nexus“ or „securitisation“ (cf. e.g. Duffield 2010). On the other hand, we discuss the intersection of „security and development“ from biopolitical and postcolonial perspectives. A central question is how discourses of in-/security are related to racist constructions of „dangerous Others“. Racist processes are also discussed in relation with other social categories, such as class, gender or sexuality.
In the second part of the seminar, we focus on case studies. We engage with concrete examples of a „development-security nexus“ along specific examples – such as region-specific development policies or current European military „development“-missions in countries of the global South. In this regard, the focus shall not only be put on dominant development policies and actors, as we shall also discuss practices of resistance such as e.g. the activist network Afrique-Europe-Interact.

Methods:
On the basis of short written assignments (three in total) students discuss the required reading. In form of group or individual presentations students discuss examples of security-focused development politics. The presentations then form the basis for the final seminar papers.

Assessment and permitted materials

a) Attendance (maximum absence of 3): 15%
b) Submission of text summaries of theoretical literature (1-2 pages) and transmission in course: 20%
c) Individual or group presentations of an example of „development-security-nexus“: 20%
d) Seminar paper: 45% (15-20 pages,12 point, 1.5 line spacing; submitted via moodle by September 30th 2019)

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

All requirements listed above must be fulfilled in order to positively complete the course. Assessment system see above.

Examination topics

In the seminar paper, students shall discuss the "development-security nexus" either on a theoretical level or with respect to a concrete case study.

Reading list

The literature discussed in the course as well as further literature is provided on moodle.

Preliminary literature:

Brand, Alexander (2011): Sicherheit über alles? Die schleichende Versicherheitlichung deutscher Entwicklungspolitik. In: PERIPHERIE, vol. 122/123(31), Verlag Westfälisches Dampfboot, Münster, S. 209-235
Brown, Stephen/Grävingholt, Jörn (eds., 2016): The Securitization of Foreign Aid. Rethinking International Development Series. Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
Chandler, David (2007): The security-development nexus and the rise of “anti-foreign policy“. In: Journal of International Relations and Development, vol. 10, 362-386.

Dillon, Michael (2004): The security of governance. In: Larner, Wendy/Walters, Williams (eds.): Global Governmentality. Governing international spaces. London: Routledge, 76-94.
Duffield, Mark (2010): The Liberal Way of Development and the Development-Security Impasse: Exploring the Global Life-Chance Divide. In: Security Dialogue, vol. 41(1), 53-76.

Fisher, Jonathan/Anderson, David M. (2015): Authoritarianism and the securitization of development in Africa. In: International Affairs, vol. 91(1), 131-151.

Foucault, Michel (2003): Society must be defended. Lectures at the Collège de France, 1975-1976. Edited by Mauro Bertani and Alessandro Fontana. Translated by Daivd Macey.

Foucault, Michel (2007): Security, Territory, Population. Lectures at the Collège de France, 1977-78. Edited by Michel Senellart. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung (ed., 2012): Human Security = Women’s Security?: Keine nachhaltige Sicherheitspolitik ohne Geschlechterperspektive. Berlin: Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung.

Larzillière, Pénélope (2017): The Discourse of Security in Development Policies: A Geneaological Approach to ‘Security Sector Reform’. In: Development Policy Review, September 15. Doi: 10.1111/dpr.12333.

Lemke, Thomas (2011): Biopolitics. An advanced introduction. With a preface by Monica Caspar and Lisa Jean Moore. Translated by Eric Frederick Trump. New York/London: New York University Press.

Maisenbacher, Julia (2015): The Political Economy of Mobility Partnerships – Structural Power in the EU’s External Migration Policy. In: New Political Economy, vol. 20 (6), 871-893.

McClintock, Anne (1995): Imperial leather. Race, Gender and Sexuality in the colonial context. New York/London: Routledge.
Piothuk, Volha (2015): Biopolitics, Governmentality and Humanitarianism: “Caring“ for the Population in Afghanistan and Belarus. Abingdon: Routledge.
Pospisil, Jan (2009): Die Entwicklung von Sicherheit. Entwicklungspolitische Programme der USA und Deutschlands im Grenzbereich zur Sicherheitspolitik. Bielfeld: transkript verlag.
Stern, Maria/Öjendal, Joakim (2010): Mapping the Security–Development Nexus: Conflict, Complexity, Cacophony, Convergence? In: Security Dialogue, vol. 41(5), 5-30.
Stoler, Ann Laura (1995): Race and the Education of Desire. Durham/London: Duke University Press.

Association in the course directory

VM1 / VM4

Last modified: Mo 26.08.2019 16:28