Universität Wien FIND
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240518 SE Anthropology of Remoteness (P4) (2019S)

Continuous assessment of course work

Participation at first session is obligatory!

Details

max. 25 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Monday 11.03. 11:30 - 14:45 Hörsaal C, NIG 4. Stock
Monday 01.04. 11:30 - 14:45 Hörsaal C, NIG 4. Stock
Monday 29.04. 11:30 - 14:45 Hörsaal C, NIG 4. Stock
Monday 13.05. 11:30 - 14:45 Hörsaal C, NIG 4. Stock
Monday 03.06. 11:30 - 14:45 Hörsaal C, NIG 4. Stock
Monday 24.06. 11:30 - 14:45 Hörsaal C, NIG 4. Stock

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

The main goal of the course is to provide an introduction to an anthropological engagement with spatial and social remoteness. In anthropology, the concept of remoteness has various social implications, ranging from core-periphery relations to marginality to political autonomy (such as 'Zomia' as used by James Scott). Topics such as connectivity/disconnectedness, distance from the centers of power, commerce, and services, as well as social, cultural and political alternative spaces will be discussed. They should provide a corrective to the recent anthropological focus on the urban and non-rural areas by drawing on ethnographic cases studies from sparsely populated, hardly accessible and geographically extreme regions of the world (the Arctic and circumpolar North among them). In addition to anthropological publications, we will review contributions by geography as a discipline focused on the spatial dimensions of human existence, demography and development studies, as well as by rural studies and other disciplines relevant for discussing social marginality and the rural/urban dichotomy. The course will have seminar character, meaning that student input and feedback will be central.

Assessment and permitted materials

A mandatory seminar paper will count for 50% (which equal 50 points) of the grade. The rest of the grade will be determined by short oral presentations and written handouts, as well as by course participation.

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

In order to receive a passing grade, you need at least 60 points. A 'sehr gut' requires at least 90 out of 100 points (a 'gut' at least 80 points, etc.). Attendance is required throughout the semester.

Examination topics

There will be no exams.

Reading list

Ardener, Edwin
2012 [1987] Remote Areas: Some Theoretical Considerations. HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory 2(1): 519-533.

Behrens, K. et al.
2005 Is Remoteness a Locational Disadvantage? Journal of Economic Geography 6(3): 347368.

Berman, Matthew
2013 Remoteness and Mobility: Transportation Routes, Technologies, and Sustainability in Arctic Communities. In Urban Sustainability in the Arctic: Visions, Contexts, and Challenges. R.W. Orttung and M. Laruelle, eds. Pp. 181-193: Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies, George Washington University.

Boller, F. et al.
2010 Fascinating Remoteness: The Dilemma of Hiking Tourism Development in Peripheral Mountain Areas. Mountain Research and Development 30(4): 320331.

Carson, Doris
2011 Population Policies at the Edge: The Demographic Ambitions of Frontiers. In Demography at the Edge: Remote Human Populations in Developed Nations. D. Carson et al., eds. Surrey: Ashgate Publishing: 321332.

Cleary, D.
1993 After the Frontier: Problems with Political Economy in the Modern Brazilian Amazon. Journal of Latin American Studies 25: 331349.

Cloke, P.J.
1985 Whither Rural Studies? Journal of Rural Studies 1(1): 19.

Coates, Kenneth
1994 The Discovery of the North: Towards a Conceptual Framework for the Study of Northern/Remote Regions. The Northern Review (12-13): 15-43.

Faulkner, H.W. and S. French
1983 Geographic Remoteness: Conceptual and Measurement Problems. Bureau of Transport Economics, Reference Paper No 54.

Hacquebord, L., & Avango, D. (2009). Settlements in an Arctic resource frontier region. Arctic Anthropology, 46, 2539.

Harms, Erik, Shafqat Hussain, and Sara Shneiderman
2014 Remote and Edgy: New Takes on Old Anthropological Themes. HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory 4(1): 361-381.

Holmes, J.H.
2009 Rethinking Remoteness. Geographical Research 47(3): 331333.

Huskey, L.ee
2005 Challenges to Economic Development: Dimensions of 'Remoteness' in the North. Polar Geography 29(2): 119125.
2006 Limits to Growth: Remote Regions, Remote Institutions. The Annals of Regional Science 40(1): 147155.

Huskey, Lee, and Thomas A. Morehouse
1992 Development in Remote Regions: What Do we Know? Arctic 45(2): 128-137.

Kopytoff, I.
1987 The African Frontier: The Reproduction of Traditional African Societies. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Kuklina, Vera, and Edward C. Holland
2017 The Roads of the Sayan Mountains: Theorizing Remoteness in Eastern Siberia. Geoforum 88: 36-44.

Markey, S., Manson, D. & George, P.
2007 The (Dis?)Connected North: Persistent Regionalism in Northern British Columbia. Canadian Journal of Regional Science/Revue canadienne des sciences régionales 1(XXX): 5778.

Salazar, Noel B.
2013 Imagining Mobility at the 'End of the World'. History and Anthropology 24(2): 233-252.

Saxer, Martin
2016 Pathways: A Concept, Field Site and Methodological Approach to Study Remoteness and Connectivity. HIMALAYA, the Journal of the Association for Nepal and Himalayan Studies 36(2): 104-119.

Saxer, Martin, Alessandro Rippa, and Alexander Horstmann
2018 Introduction. In Asian Borderlands in a Global Perspective. A. Horstmann, M. Saxer, and A. Rippa, eds. Pp. 1-14. New York: Routledge.

Scott, James C.
2009 The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Shubin, Sergei
2006 The Changing Nature of Rurality and Rural Studies in Russia. Journal of Rural Studies 22: 422-440.

Tsing, Anna
1994 From the Margins. Cultural Anthropology 9(3): 279-297.
2003 Natural Resources and Capitalist Frontiers. Economic and Political Weekly 38(48): 5100-5106.

Turner, F. J.
2010 [1920] The Frontier in American History. New York: Courier.

Wellhofer, E.S.
1989 Core and Periphery: Territorial Dimensions in Politics. Urban Studies 26(3): 340355.

Association in the course directory

Last modified: Tu 27.08.2019 10:08