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280189 VU Synchrotron Methods in Environmental Sciences (PI) (2017S)

Continuous assessment of course work

Registration/Deregistration

Details

Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Details about the teaching schedule and the class hours will be announced in the first lecture on May 17, 2017.

Wednesday 17.05. 15:15 - 17:45 Seminarraum Paläontologie 2B311 3.OG UZA II
Friday 19.05. 13:00 - 16:15 Seminarraum Geochemie 2C193 1.OG UZA II
Wednesday 24.05. 15:15 - 17:45 Mikroskopiepraktikum Geowissenschaften 2A205 2.OG UZA II
Friday 26.05. 13:00 - 16:15 Seminarraum Geochemie 2C193 1.OG UZA II
Wednesday 31.05. 15:15 - 17:45 Seminarraum Paläontologie 2B311 3.OG UZA II
Friday 02.06. 13:00 - 16:15 Seminarraum Geochemie 2C193 1.OG UZA II
Wednesday 07.06. 15:15 - 17:45 Seminarraum Paläontologie 2B311 3.OG UZA II
Friday 09.06. 13:00 - 16:15 Seminarraum Geochemie 2C193 1.OG UZA II

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

Recent developments at synchrotron sources around the world provide an excellent tool to understand the mechanisms of coupled biotic and abiotic reaction pathways, and their reaction kinetics in order to integrate molecular constraints with modeling efforts. Lack of molecular-level insight hinders the development of accurate reaction networks, which in turn limits the predictive ability of contaminant fate and transport.

This course aims to provide an in-depth overview of the state-of-the-art synchrotron based x-ray spectroscopy, imaging, and scattering techniques commonly used in the realm of environmental geosciences. Emphasis will be given on teaching the experimental design, data acquisition strategies, and data analysis approaches suitable for realistic environmental systems. Case studies presented in this course would demonstrate that an in-depth understanding of molecular-scale processes affecting elemental speciation, distribution, and local coordination environment is a critical research need for modelling the global cycling of elements in order to advance fundamental understanding of coupled reaction processes in complex natural environments and enable system-level environmental prediction and decision support.

Since a rigorous mathematical treatment of the theoretical aspects of these techniques are beyond the scope of this course, students are not expected to have advanced calculus knowledge. However basic calculus is a prerequisite.

Assessment and permitted materials

Students will be evaluated based on 1) homework assignments, 2) class participation, 3) final presentation, and 4) a paper due before the end of semester.

The percentage weighting assigned to each component of this class is given below:
Homework 30%
Class Participation 10%
Presentation 30%
Paper 30%

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

In order to pass the course (grade 4), it will be necessary to reach 50% of all accumulated points. Higher grades will be achieved with >59% (grade 3), >74% (grade 2), and >89% (grade 1) of the accumulated points.

Examination topics

Reading list

Reading material will be distributed in class.

Association in the course directory

Last modified: Mo 07.09.2020 15:42