Universität Wien FIND

290051 PS Transformations of Armed Conflicts in South and Southeast Asia (2016W)

4.00 ECTS (2.00 SWS), SPL 29 - Geographie
Continuous assessment of course work

Details

max. 30 participants
Language: German

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

No show in the first meeting will result in the disqualification from the seminar as all in class working assignments will be assigned in the first meeting.

Tuesday 04.10. 08:30 - 10:00 Seminarraum Geographie NIG 5.OG C0528
Tuesday 11.10. 08:30 - 10:00 Seminarraum Geographie NIG 5.OG C0528
Tuesday 18.10. 08:30 - 10:00 Seminarraum Geographie NIG 5.OG C0528
Tuesday 25.10. 08:30 - 10:00 Seminarraum Geographie NIG 5.OG C0528
Tuesday 08.11. 08:30 - 10:00 Seminarraum Geographie NIG 5.OG C0528
Tuesday 15.11. 08:30 - 10:00 Seminarraum Geographie NIG 5.OG C0528
Tuesday 22.11. 08:30 - 10:00 Seminarraum Geographie NIG 5.OG C0528
Tuesday 29.11. 08:30 - 10:00 Seminarraum Geographie NIG 5.OG C0528
Tuesday 06.12. 08:30 - 10:00 Seminarraum Geographie NIG 5.OG C0528
Tuesday 13.12. 08:30 - 10:00 Seminarraum Geographie NIG 5.OG C0528
Tuesday 10.01. 08:30 - 10:00 Seminarraum Geographie NIG 5.OG C0528
Tuesday 17.01. 08:30 - 10:00 Seminarraum Geographie NIG 5.OG C0528
Tuesday 24.01. 08:30 - 10:00 Seminarraum Geographie NIG 5.OG C0528
Tuesday 31.01. 08:30 - 10:00 Seminarraum Geographie NIG 5.OG C0528

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

South and Southeast Asia are shaped by a unique ethnic, linguistic and religious diversity. The same holds true for the political systems of the regions' nation states that emerged in the era of decolonization after the 2nd World War. With India and Indonesia, South and Southeast Asia are home to two of the three largest democracies in the world. On the other hand, states like Brunei, Laos, Singapore, and Vietnam are still considered autocracies.

Despite the heterogeneity of the regions that might suggest relatively high potentials for societal conflicts, South and Southeast Asia are by no means more prone to armed conflicts than other regions in the world. Yet, the post-colonial nation building processes of the regions' states were, time and again, accompanied by the outbreak of armed conflicts in which liberation and resistance movement of different types and backgrounds tried to fight for secession and/or more self-determination and participation. As opposed to many transnational violent conflicts in the so-called "failed states" of Sub-Saharan Africa where private "violent entrepreneurs" often replace the state's monopoly on violence, in South and Southeast Asia, violent conflicts are predominantly domestic in nature. One exception of the case studies that will be discussed in the seminar will be the so-called Kashmir conflict that is shaped by domestic and transnational dimensions of conflicting interests between India and Pakistan.
From a comparative perspective, South and Southeast Asia show very different tendencies regarding the transformation of their armed conflicts from predominantly violent means of conflict management to peaceful or political means. In Southeast Asia, on the one hand, there is a clear tendency towards politically negotiated conflict resolutions. In South Asia, on the other hand, violent conflicts either take the form of extended crises or are "resolved" militarily.

The seminar aims at offering the students a theoretically grounded, comparative overview of causes, characteristics, effects and courses of armed conflicts in South and Southeast Asia as well as potential approaches to their peaceful resolution. In the first section of the seminar, we will jointly develop an analytical framework which shall be used for presenting and analyzing the different cases that will be discussed in the second (Southeast Asia) and third (South Asia) sections.

The working methods utilized in the seminar will include joint analyses and discussions of relevant texts and documents, own research of sources and materials, in class presentation of research results and the writing of a term paper. Cooperative methods of working will be used whenever adequate and possible.

Assessment and permitted materials

The following requirements must be fulfilled to pass the course:

- regular attendance and active participation (presence in at least 75% of the sessions
- own research work
- in class presentation with handout (to be submitted five days prior to the presentation)
- writing of a study portfolio based on the compulsory readings (1 page/week, to be
submitted on Moodle on the eve of each session)
- writing of a term paper (15 pages, to be submitted by 31 March 2017)

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

Attendance in at least 75% of the session. Sick absence with a medical sickness certificate of more than 25% of the sessions can be compensated with additional assignments.

In class presentation and term paper will be marked individually, each representing 50% of the final mark. Both assignments have to be passed individually. An assignment is passed with a minimum grade of 4.

For a successful completion of the course, all study portfolios have to be submitted latest on the eve before the final session.

Grading scheme:

100 - 86 % - grade 1
85 - 71 % - grade 2
70 - 56 % - grade 3
55 - 41 % - grade 4
40 - 0 % - grade 5

An additional grading scheme for term papers can be downloaded in the Moodle course and will be explained in the first session.

Examination topics

The examination will encompass our joint analyses and discussions of relevant texts and documents, own research of sources and materials, in class presentation of research results and a term paper.

Reading list

All texts for compulsory readings can be downloaded in the Moodle course.

Association in the course directory

(MG-S6-PI.f) (L2-d2, L2-d-zLV) (UF MA GW 02)

Last modified: Fr 31.08.2018 08:56