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400019 SE SE Methods for Doctoral Candidates (2020W)

Continuous assessment of course work

Registration/Deregistration

Details

max. 15 participants
Language: English

Lecturers

Classes (iCal) - next class is marked with N

Thursday 15.10. 15:00 - 18:00 Seminarraum A, NIG 4. Stock
Thursday 29.10. 15:00 - 18:00 Seminarraum A, NIG 4. Stock
Thursday 12.11. 15:00 - 18:00 Digital
Thursday 19.11. 15:00 - 18:00 Digital
Thursday 26.11. 16:45 - 20:00 Digital
Thursday 10.12. 15:00 - 18:00 Digital
Thursday 14.01. 15:00 - 18:00 Digital

Information

Aims, contents and method of the course

This course focuses on ethnographic methods and is aimed though not exclusively - to doctoral students who have not carried out their fieldwork research yet. The seminar delves into long-standing issues around ethnographic methods largely from a conceptual perspective. What is more, it will also help students identifying alternative avenues of investigation for research projects that have been or will be disrupted by the ongoing pandemic. At the beginning of the seminar, students will have the possibility to suggest specific areas or contexts of research that are most helpful to their projects so that additional readings may be added to the existing ones. The seminar will begin with an analysis of the interventions in the Forum on the COVID-19 Pandemic published on Social Anthropology/Anthropologie Sociale earlier this year to chart a landscape of the novel situations which anthropologists are facing regarding their research or field. These interventions feature both continuities and new problematics, modalities and questions that the pandemic has generated across countless areas of research: these will help re-think and re-situate ‘classic’ approaches to ethnography and vice versa.

Assessment and permitted materials

1) Regular attendance (up to 1 session may be missed)
2) Active and critical engagement with the assigned readings and participation in the seminar discussions;
3) Presentation of a reading (the presentation will last for 10 minutes during which the student will introduce the selected reading’s author as well as her methods, theories and arguments), and preparation of a set of questions emerging from the presentation and chairing of the discussion;
4) Presentation of individual doctoral research projects;
5) Submission of a term exam paper (8-10 pages)

Minimum requirements and assessment criteria

For a positive grade, 51 % is required

90-100 %= 1
77-89 %= 2
64-76 %= 3
51-63 %= 4
0-50 % = 5

Written exams will be evaluated according to the following criteria:
-language and style (spelling and grammar)
-thorough understanding of the readings discussed in class
-use of the literature (choice of relevant readings, accuracy of the citations and arguments)
-clarity of arguments
-reflexivity
-critical thinking and originality

Active participation in the course discussions will be assessed both in terms of the quantity and the quality of the students’ contributions.

Examination topics

Presentations, written papers, and active participation in discussions

Reading list

15/10 15:00 - 18:00

Introduction: The challenges ahead

2020. Forum on COVID-19 Pandemic. Social Anthropology/Anthropologie Sociale, 28 (2)
Available from:
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/14698676/2020/28/2

Nelson, A., 2020 Society after pandemic
Available from:
https://items.ssrc.org/covid-19-and-the-social-sciences/society-after-pandemic/

29/10 15:00 - 18:00

Long-standing concerns

Nader, L., 2011. Ethnography as theory. HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory, 1 (1), 211219

Biehl, J., 2013. Ethnography in the way of theory. Cultural Anthropology, 28 (4), 573597

Fassin, D., 2013. Why ethnography matters: On anthropology and its publics. Cultural Anthropology, 28 (4), 621646

12/11 15:00 - 18:00

Self, other, and becoming

Marcus, G., 2012. The viral intimacies of ethnographic encounters: Prolegomenon to a thought experiment in the play of metaphors. Cultural Anthropology, 27 (1), 168174

Napier, D.A., 2012. NONSELF HELP: How immunology might reframe the Enlightenment. Cultural Anthropology, 27 (1), 122-137

Lowe, C., 2010. Viral clouds: Becoming H5N1 in Indonesia. Cultural Anthropology, 25 (4), 625649

Singer, M., 2014. Zoonotic ecosyndemics and multispecies ethnography. Anthropological Quarterly, 87 (4), 1279-1309

19/11 15:00 - 18:00

Multi-sited and global fieldwork

Coleman, S., and, P., 2011. Introduction: Queries, collaborations, calibrations. In: S. Coleman and P. von Hellermann, eds. Multi-sited ethnography: Problems and possibilities in the translocation of research methods. New York, London: Routledge, 1-15

Comaroff, J. and Comaroff, J., 2003. Ethnography on an awkward scale: Postcolonial anthropology and the violence of abstraction. Ethnography, 4 (2), 147179

Marcus, G., 2011. Multi-sited ethnography: Five or six things I know about it now. In: S. Coleman and P. von Hellermann, eds. Multi-sited ethnography: Problems and possibilities in the translocation of research methods. New York, London: Routledge, 16-32

Ferguson, J., 2011. Novelty and method: Reflections on global fieldwork.In: S. Coleman and P. von Hellermann, eds. Multi-sited ethnography: Problems and possibilities in the translocation of research methods. New York, London: Routledge, 194-207

26/11 16:45 - 20:00

Digital ethnography

Boellstorff, T., Nardi, B., Pearce, C., and Taylor, T.L., 2013. Ethnography and virtual worlds: A handbook of method. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1-12

Bonilla, Y. and Rosa, J., 2015. Ferguson. Digital protest, hashtag ethnography, and the racial politics of social media in the United States. American Ethnologist, 42 (1), 4-17

Hjorth, L., Horst, H., Galloway, A.andBell, L., 2017. Introduction. In: L. Hjorth,H.Horst, A.Galloway, andL. Bell, eds. The Routledge companion to digital ethnography.Abingdon: Routledge, 1-7.

Kraemer, J., 2016. Doing fieldwork, BRB: Locating the field on and with emerging media. In: R. Sanjek and S.W. Tratner, eds. eFieldnotes: The makings of anthropology in the digital world. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 113-131
10/12 15:00 - 18:00

In-person ethnography and its predicaments

Hewlett, B.L., ed., 2019. The secret lives of anthropologists: Lessons from the field. Routledge: London and New York

14/01 15:00 - 18:00

Collaborations

Lassiter, L.E., 2005. The Chicago guide to collaborative ethnography. Chicago: Chicago University Press

Horst H., 2016. Being in fieldwork: Collaboration, digital media, and ethnographic practice. In: R. Sanjek and S.W. Tratner, eds. eFieldnotes: The makings of anthropology in the digital world. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 153-168

Burrell, J., 2016. ‘‘Through a screen darkly’’: On remote, collaborative fieldwork in the digital age. In: R. Sanjek and S.W. Tratner, eds. eFieldnotes: The makings of anthropology in the digital world. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 132-152

Association in the course directory

Last modified: We 11.11.2020 10:10