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140227 KU Visions of Equality: Work and Organized Labour in Africa (2019S)

Prüfungsimmanente Lehrveranstaltung

An/Abmeldung

Details

max. 50 Teilnehmer*innen
Sprache: Englisch

Lehrende

Termine (iCal) - nächster Termin ist mit N markiert

Montag 04.03. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Montag 11.03. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Montag 18.03. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Montag 25.03. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Montag 01.04. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Montag 08.04. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Montag 29.04. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Montag 06.05. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Montag 13.05. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Montag 20.05. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Montag 27.05. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Montag 03.06. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Montag 17.06. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03
Montag 24.06. 13:00 - 15:00 Inst. f. Afrikawissenschaften, Seminarraum 1 UniCampus Hof 5 2M-O1-03

Information

Ziele, Inhalte und Methode der Lehrveranstaltung

Under the recent conditions of neoliberal globalization and growing inequalities, social conflict has been surging in many African countries. In 2012, a wildcat strike at the Lonmin platinum mine at Marikana (South Africa) was brutally put down by police forces causing the massacre of 34 mine workers. In 2017, Ethiopia experienced its largest wave of strikes since the 1974 revolution. In 2018, three national trade union federations in Nigeria successfully called for a nationwide strike to put pressure on the government to double the countries’ minimum wage for workers. To understand these recent conflicts and demands we will examine processes of labour formation and labour organization in Africa from global history and contemporary perspectives.

The course offers, firstly, an opportunity to examine various forms of work on the African continent, including categories such as white-collar and blue-collar labour, waged and forced labour, domestic work or migrant labour, mining, and or other types of manual labour. We will discuss how different kinds of labour have been gendered and have reflected racialized hierarchies of colonial rule.

In relation to this we will, secondly, investigate the history of organized labour movements and their global connections to the Pan-Africanist diaspora, trade unionist federations and international organisations. Since African workers were the backbone of the labour-intensive colonial economy, organized labour movements could position themselves as significant players in the process of decolonization. Increasingly from the interwar period onward, African workers organized themselves in associations, unions and societies while still under the colonial yoke and sought cooperation with international trade union bodies such as the US-dominated ICFTU and the Soviet-dominated WFTU. With the attainment of independence in most African countries in the 1960s – and some trade union leaders turning into presidents – the new class of postcolonial politicians circumscribed trade unions’ room for maneuver. Since the 1990s, trade unions have been trying to renegotiate their role in neoliberal settings – but in many ways, a narrow trade unionism has posed limits to mobilization as only a minority of the population in most parts of the continent is employed in the formal sector. Recently, some trade unions have responded to this predicament by becoming more inclusive and reviving forms of broader political protests.

Students will have the chance to choose a case study within these broader fields and, in collaboration with other colleagues, contribute to a special exhibition based on their work done during the semester. The exhibition will be shown at the Department of African Studies during the whole 2019/2020 academic year. In preparing their exhibition pieces, students may use not only “classic” forms of paper and printed text but also audio-visual installations, photographs, or other forms they find suitable to present their topic. Students are also invited to use their creativity and organizational skills in the planning of the “Schnittpunkte” event in the first week of October 2019 which will kick off the exhibition.

Art der Leistungskontrolle und erlaubte Hilfsmittel

Short written paper, continuous participation in discussions during the seminar as well as personal effort in developing the “Schnittpunkte“ project

Mindestanforderungen und Beurteilungsmaßstab

Regular presence in the seminar (course with continuous assessment of students‘ performance), elaboration of thematic contexts and single case study, teamwork, translation of scientific knowledge into exhibition/practice.

Prüfungsstoff

Joint reading of the basic literature, survey of concepts and approaches, individual compilation of a case study and the writing of a short paper; project work includes the preparation of contributions for the "Schnittpunkte" event at the Department of African Studies in the first week of October 2019 and the curating of the exhibition that is connected to it.

Literatur

This list of literature should help students to get an overview on existing research. The list of mandatory readings will be tailored to fit students’ interests in the first session.

Agyeman, Opoku. The failure of grassroots Pan-Africanism: The case of the All-African Trade Union Federation. Lanham: Lexington Books, 2003.

Ananaba, Wogu (1979): The Trade Union Movement in Africa. Promise and Performance. London: Hurst.

Bellucci, Stefano. “Wage labour and capital in Africa: a historical perspective.” Labor History 58, no. 2 (2017): 133-137.

Bernards, Nick. “The International Labour Organization and African trade unions: Tripartite fantasies and enduring struggles.” Review of African Political Economy 44, no. 153 (2017): 399–414.

Cooper, Frederick. “The Dialectics of Decolonization: Nationalism and Labor Movements in Postwar French Africa.” In Tensions of empire: Colonial cultures in a bourgeois world. Edited by Frederick Cooper and Ann L. Stoler, 406–35. Berkeley, Los Angeles, London: University of California Press, 1997.

Cooper, Frederick (1996): Decolonization and African society. The labor question in French and British Africa. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Curless, Gareth. “Introduction: Trade unions in the global south from imperialism to the present day.” Labor History 57, no. 1 (2016): 1–19.

Damachi, Ukandi G./Seibel, Dieter H./Trachtman, Lester (ed. 1979): Industrial Relations in Africa.

Davis, Ioan (1966): African Trade Unions. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books.

Eckert, Andreas, ed. Global Histories of Work. Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter Oldenbourg, 2016.

Freund, Bill (1988): The African worker. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Geiss, Imanuel (1965): Gewerkschaften in Afrika. Hannover: Verlag für Literatur und Zeitgeschehen.

Gutkind, Peter C. W./Cohen, Robin/Copans, Jean (ed. 1978): African Labor History. Beverly Hills: Sage.

Lucassen, Leo. “Working together: New directions in global labour history.” Journal of Global History 11, no. 01 (2016): 66–87.

Phelan, Craig. “When Visions Collide: Thomas Sankara, Trade Unions and the Revolution in Burkina Faso, 1983-1987.” In The Life, Politics and Legacies of Thomas Sankara. Edited by Amber Murrey, 62–74. Black Critique. London: Pluto Press, 2018.

Richards, Yevette. “Labor's Gendered Misstep: The Women's Committee and African Women Workers, 1957—1968.” The International Journal of African Historical Studies 44, no. 3 (2011): 415–42.

Richards, Yevette. Maida Springer: Pan-Africanist and international labor leader. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2000.

Sandbrook, Richard/Cohen, Robin (ed. 1975): The Development of an African working class. Studies in class formation and action. London: Longman.

Schenck, Marcia C. “A chronology of nostalgia: Memories of former Angolan and Mozambican worker trainees to East Germany.” Labor History 59, no. 3 (2018): 352–74.

Werbner, Pnina. “Rethinking class and culture in Africa: Between E. P. Thompson and Pierre Bourdieu.” Review of African Political Economy 45, no. 155 (2017): 7–24.

Zeleza, Tiyambe. “Pan-african Trade Unionism: Unity and Discord.” Transafrican Journal of History 15 (1986): 164–90.

Zuordnung im Vorlesungsverzeichnis

SAG.KU.1, SAG.KU.2
IE: VM3

Letzte Änderung: Do 29.10.2020 00:22